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Old at Love Young at Heart

July 20, 2019

first_imgby, Marcia Barhydt, GuestBloggerTweet7Share31ShareEmail38 SharesI am honoured and thrilled to be a contributor to ChangingAging™, a multi-blog platform challenging conventional views on aging. The ChangingAging Blogstream uses social media tools to help those of us who believe in a better old age communicate our message to audiences who are important to us. I’m a dedicated advocate of older women and men in our world and I’m an advocate of changing the image our world has of these men and women. These people are not throw-away; they have so much to add to our knowledge, our perceptions and our happiness. They cannot be dismissed or tucked away in a retirement residence or nursing home. They need to be revered and placed at the top of our value scale. A colleague of mine, Angela Gentile, a Geriatric Mental Health Clinician at Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, has put together a video, “Old Love, Young at Heart,” about older women and men in love, showing their sensuousness, their physical contact, their tactile relationships: I want this kind of love when I grow older. Don’t we all? Angela has created a second video, “Beautiful Older Women of the World,” also on YouTube: And I want this peace with myself that these women have when I grow older. Don’t we all? Old at Love is about, well, how we love as older women. Beautiful Older Women is about how we love ourselves. Our inner beauty shines through even when we’re on our own without a partner. Now, after these two videos, when I say that beauty is inside a woman, I know I’m on the right track. Our beauty changes, but it never goes away, it goes inside of us. Love changes, but it grows into an incredible intimacy that the world can see in Old at Love. The women and men there are so in sync with each other and they’re so enjoying it that it jumps out of each picture and breaks any preconceived images that I may have had about older people and intimacy. Are some of the pictures posed? Of course, but what’s not posed is the feeling, the warmth, the love they have for each other. They are one entity together, parts of each other. When you look at the faces of the men and women in the first video, Old at Love, you’ll see, as I see, love and happiness that we can only know after a lifetime of searching or experiencing. This mindset, approach to aging has to be the norm for everyone younger than these fantastic couples. And the faces of those older women, Beautiful Older Women of the World, – each line is one story of her life perhaps, an experience that has brought her to now, today. This is what real beauty is, not something artificial that we promote as beauty when we’re younger. We need to change the way we perceive aging and think about the final stage of our life. It’s the final reward for having experienced so much of life. Aging gives us the comfort with ourselves and with others, to smile, feel warm, about all we see in those younger than we are. What I see in my world is that there are a number of women, a fairly large number, who realize that aging, being an older woman, is one of the finest parts of our lives. I’m 68 now and aside from when my daughters were little, I know that this is the best stage of my life so far. We have more sense of play, more confidence to enjoy laughing and even looking goofy, more confidence to show everyone, including but not limited to, our partners. The bonus of wisdom and appreciation that all life has to give, comes right now with an acceptance that aging is not just good, but also the epitome of the accumulation of life. Aging, being older, is the payback of life. If we can pass this gift on to our children, I think we’ll be making the first step in reducing and maybe even eliminating ageism. I think we’ll be starting a movement, an advocacy, a fan club, for older men women and their beauty. We need to continuously attempt to revere the older women and men in our own circles. We need to change the face of aging.©Marcia Barhydt, 2013Related PostsBeauty and Wisdom, The Last GenerationAfter four years of photographing and interviewing a generation of women who have been making weekly visits to beauty parlors for decades, the book of Beauty and Wisdom has just been published.Who’s Going to Create a Better Narrative of Old Age in America?Changing the culture is hard, and it involves struggle. That struggle doesn’t start in a shopping cart, whether online or at Walmart. It starts between our ears, with the uncomfortable task of confronting our own, largely unconscious, age bias.The Manifesto Against Ageism is HereAbout eight years ago, Ashton Applewhite began interviewing people over 80 for a project called “So when are you going to retire?” It didn’t take her long to realize that almost everything she thought she knew about aging was wrong. So she wrote a book to set the record straight.Tweet7Share31ShareEmail38 SharesTags: Ageism beauty love youtubelast_img read more

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Undergraduate students design walker to overcome challenges of pediatric ICU patients

July 20, 2019

first_img Source:https://www.jhu.edu/ May 2 2018The AmbuMate could help ailing children out of bed – and the hospital – faster.Critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units once were often heavily sedated and discouraged from any activities, including walking, to facilitate speedy recovery. Though that approach has been turned on its head in recent years, efforts to get young patients up on their feet quickly have brought new challenges.An undergraduate student design team from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University is developing a walker designed to overcome those challenges and get these young patients up and moving as quickly as possible.”In the PICU, patients often have a lot of different pieces of equipment tethered to them,” says Nolan Benner, a senior studying biomedical engineering and the design team leader. This means that patients often need the assistance of up to five nurses and therapists to help drag large monitors and medical devices along, he says.”We saw an opportunity to make that process a little easier for the nurses and patients involved,” Benner says.The team’s solution: AmbuMate, a walker that makes it easier to transport multiple medical devices hooked to the patient, facilitating ambulation in the PICU. It has various conveniences to improve the experience of patients and caregivers, such as support for patient fatigue and wire/tube management to make the process less chaotic. The AmbuMate’s features will also reduce the set-up time needed for the ambulation compared to its adult ICU competitors.”Historically, ICUs have prevented patients from moving to mitigate risks, but we now know that mobility can facilitate healing,” says Nicholas J. Durr, assistant professor of biomedical engineering and director of undergraduate design team courses.Sapna Kudchadkar, an associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, as well as director of the Johns Hopkins PICU Clinical Research Program, approached the BME design team course instructors about the project.Kudchadkar, an expert in pediatric intensive care who has worked to introduce sweeping changes to the way ill children are rehabilitated nationwide, presented a straightforward challenge: How can we help young patients get up and moving as soon as possible?Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellAlternate cell growth pathway could open door to new treatments for metastatic cancersNANOLIVE‘s novel CX-A defines a new standard for live cell imaging in 96 well plates for continuous organelle monitoring in cell populations”We wanted a contraption where you could put all of the equipment in the same place and move everything as one unit,” Kudchadkar says.The biomedical engineering students have been working on their prototype since September, tweaking the design and functionality. “If you look at our design, it’s modular,” says Shivani Pandey, a first-year design team member. “We’re trying to have large-scale prototypes, but at any point we’re also working on different parts of the design.”The movement toward early mobility for PICU patients first originated at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2013, when Kudchadkar and a team of nurses, therapists, and other stakeholders came together to create the PICU Up! protocol.The protocol is built on the premise that regularly scheduled activity for hospitalized children helps them recover faster. Nurses and practitioners establish a daily routine that improves patients’ sleep hygiene. This means no naps during the day and never being woken up for bath time or X-rays during the night (as is otherwise usual). If the children are extremely sick, they are passively exercised, meaning someone else helps them move their muscles. As children get better, they are made to sit on the edge of their bed, stand, or sit in a chair close to the bed. Some even go so far as to be able to walk around the PICU with a breathing tube attached.”We needed a multidisciplinary program to create a culture of mobility, to say it’s OK to keep kids more awake and to get them exercising earlier,” Kudchadkar says. “Then, they can come off the ventilator sooner, they can leave the ICU sooner and, hopefully, get back to the quality of life that they had before their illness.”The Johns Hopkins student design team hopes to market its device to PICUs that are adopting Kudchadkar’s PICU Up!”We’d love to take this to market, actually have our device being used in pediatric intensive care units and adult ICUs to help patients walk and feel better, improve patient outcomes and probably make life easier for nurses as well,” Benner said.last_img read more

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Link between frailty and mortality remains unchanged despite lower death rates study

July 20, 2019

first_imgThe relationship between frailty and death is complex, but has shown to be remarkably stable over time particularly in those with high levels of frailty where mortality risk is high.” Source:http://www.bgs.org.uk/home-1/press-and-pr/bgs-press-releases/lower-deaths-overall-but-frailty-is-still-fatal-say-researchers Jun 18 2018A study published today in Age and Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society, found that despite death rates in the UK now being much lower than in the 1990s, the relationship between higher levels of frailty and mortality remains unchanged. Reduced mortality rates in older age appear to apply to those with little frailty, while older people with higher levels of frailty are not seeing a benefit.The study, conducted by a researchers at Newcastle University’s Institute for Ageing, drew their conclusions from two large studies of older people in England, conducted 20 years apart to test whether the amount of frailty has changed over time, and whether the relationship between frailty and death has changed.Related StoriesAlmost 3 million deaths linked to low fruit and vegetable intake, warns studyUltra-Processed foods delay satiety, increase food intake and weight gainAnorexia may be as much a metabolic disorder as it is a psychiatric one, say scientistsThe measurement of frailty has become increasingly important as evidenced by the inclusion of frailty within the requirements of an assessment in general practice, and new tools to assist doctors in emergency departments evaluate frailty quickly. The relationship between frailty and mortality has been seen across the world, giving rise to suggestions that it is one measure that is consistent across time and place.Researchers found that despite a slight increase in the frailty of the population, and a marked decrease in the mortality of the general population over the age of 65, the relationship between frailty and two-year mortality has been relatively stable. This complex relationship may be partly accounted for by a reduction of mortality at lower levels of frailty and improved diagnosis. Their findings also agree with previous reports that women have higher frailty scores but lower mortality than men, indicating although men generally have better health in older age, women tend to live longer.Fiona Matthews, Professor of Epidemiology at Newcastle University’s Institute for Ageing and lead author of the Age and Ageing paper, said:center_img The Age & Ageing paper ‘Is frailty a stable predictor of mortality across time? Evidence from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies’ can be viewed here: https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afy077last_img read more

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Study Effects of in vitro fertilization depend on genetic variation inherited from

July 20, 2019

first_img Source:https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/health/novel-information-about-the-effects-of-in-vitro-fertilization-on-embryonic-growth Jun 19 2018In vitro fertilization affects the regulatory region of genes essential for placental and embryonic growth, as well as the birth weight. A new study suggests that the effects depend on genetic variation inherited from the parents. This information could be useful in development of assisted reproduction technologies.It is known that in vitro fertilization, IVF, can affect the size of the newborns. Children derived from fresh embryo transfer have smaller birth weight, and surprisingly, children derived from frozen embryo transfer have subtly higher birth weight in average.In the study conducted by University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Tartu, the researchers looked for mechanisms how the IVF can alter the embryonic growth. More than three percent of newborns are derived from IVF treatments currently in Finland.86 couples with IVF derived pregnancies and 157 couples with spontaneous pregnancies as controls were recruited for this study. IVF samples were divided in two groups depending on whether the embryos were transferred in utero fresh after fertilization, or after they were frozen and thawed before the transfer.The regulation region of two growth genes, insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 was examined. A common genetic variation in this region has been associated with different amount of epigenetic marks depending on which variants an individual has inherited from the parents.DNA methylation, the most well-known epigenetic mark was investigated in this study. These methyl groups bind to the DNA strand and affect the gene function.”We divided the placentas in genotypes according to the variants which the newborns had inherited, and we observed that the effect of IVF on the epigenetic marks depends on the genotype.” explains Adjunct professor Nina Kaminen-Ahola, the leader of the research team at the University of Helsinki.Related StoriesCoffee helps develop healthy gut microbes and aids bowel movementsScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchAre fruit fly ‘avatars’ the next step in personalized medicine?Furthermore, the birth weight and placental weight as well as the head circumference of newborns, which were derived from fresh embryo transfer, were smaller only in one particular genotype. Also, the newborns with this genotype, who were derived from frozen embryo transfer, were significantly heavier.”This work together with our previous work about the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on embryonic development, reveals a genotype-specific effects of environmental factors.” states Kaminen-Ahola. “As far as I know, this is the first genetic factor which has been associated with the phenotype of IVF-derived newborns”.”This single nucleotide polymorphism locates in the binding site of a regulatory protein, and thus could affect the binding of the protein as well as gene function in altered environmental conditions. However, the effect of this variation on the regulation of these growth genes should be examined by functional studies.”Kaminen-Ahola emphasizes that these changes are not dangerous and IVF treatments are safe. “Low birth weight has been associated with increased risk for heart and vascular diseases and therefore it is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying it to develop the IVF methods”.”In the future, this could be a part of personalized medicine and help to target the sources of health care system more specifically.”last_img read more

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Whales have elastic nerves

July 20, 2019

first_imgWhen hungry, a blue whale pumps its tail and fluke, accelerating through swarms of krill and other small animals with a lunge and a gaping jaw that can dangle nearly perpendicular to its body. The volume of briny, prey-laden water engulfed can often surpass the original volume of the leviathan—the largest known animal that has ever existed. To accommodate the big gulp, a family of baleen whales called rorquals (Balaenopteridae) that includes blue, fin, and humpback whales have evolved unique features such as highly flexible jaw joints, a deformable tongue that inverts into a sac to hold the seawater, and grooved ventral blubber—stretching from the mouth to the belly button—that can balloon to several times its original size. Now, a new study has identified another necessary adaptation: nerves in the whales’ tongue and mouth that, as seen above, can extend to more than double their original length, a team of researchers reports today in Current Biology. Stretching vertebrate nerves normally leads to pain, paralysis, or even the detachment of nerve roots from the spinal cord. Rorquals’ nerves extend, however, thanks to folded bundles of nerve fibers in each nerve’s core that are surrounded by a thick wall of folded collagen and elastin—the same protein that keeps skin elastic. When the whales’ mouths expand, the nerve bundles, collagen, and elastin unfold until the collagen stiffens, preventing overelongation, and the elastin like a bungee cord snaps the nerves to their previous shape.last_img read more

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Blazing hot exoplanet has sunscreen layer

July 20, 2019

first_imgAstronomers have found a stratosphere—a protective atmospheric layer—around a blisteringly hot exoplanet once thought to be too toasty to have one, they report in a paper to be published in The Astrophysical Journal. On Earth, ozone in the stratosphere provides the “sunscreen” that allows life to exist: It absorbs harmful ultraviolet light from the sun and converts it into heat. Planets like Jupiter and Saturn also have stratospheres that convert UV with hydrocarbons instead of ozone. But neither ozone nor hydrocarbons can survive around the hot, giant planets often found close to other stars. Now, a team of astronomers studying WASP-33b, an exoplanet 4.5 times the mass of Jupiter, found that it, too, has a key signal of a stratosphere: temperature inversion. Because the UV-converting molecules in the upper layers of the stratosphere bear the full brunt of the sun’s rays, the upper layers are warmer than the bottom layers. So temperature rises with higher altitude, the opposite of what happens in Earth’s troposphere (the layer directly under the stratosphere where weather happens). In the case of WASP-33b, researchers used images from the Hubble Space Telescope to detect light from different altitudes in the planet’s atmosphere as it passed behind its parent star. Low down in the atmosphere, the light showed a signal of water at 1600°C, whereas higher up it was aabout 3200°C. What was causing the temperature inversion? Titanium oxide detected in the atmosphere, the team guesses—one of only a few compounds that can both absorb UV and exist as a gas without breaking up at such a high temperature.last_img read more

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Biggest producer of coffee could see beangrowing land shrink nearly 90 by

July 20, 2019

first_img Biggest producer of coffee could see bean-growing land shrink nearly 90% by 2050 REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate The news isn’t getting any better for the future of coffee. Several studies have already predicted that climate change could halve the amount of farmland worldwide suitable for growing coffee by 2050, mainly because of increasing temperatures. Now, an ecological model of Latin America, the biggest producer, suggests even greater declines: Habitat for coffee could shrink by 88%, with particularly large losses in the lowlands of Nicaragua, Honduras, and Venezuela. The researchers also examined how future climate will impact the domesticated honey bee and 38 other bee species that pollinate coffee plants and boost yields. Although conditions will improve for pollinators on up to 22% of the future growing area for coffee—generally higher elevation areas, such as in Mexico—as much as 51% of the coffee-growing area will have fewer bee species, and that will likely dent yields, the researchers report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. What can growers do? The study suggests they may need to cater to their bee populations by minimizing use of pesticides and keeping a diversity of native plants to provide other food for bees.center_img By Erik StokstadSep. 11, 2017 , 3:00 PMlast_img read more

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Top stories Science Nobels a giant insect back from the dead and

July 20, 2019

first_imgThe insult “You’re a Neandertal!” has taken on dramatic new meaning in the past few years, as researchers have begun to identify the genes many of us inherited from our long-extinct relatives. By sequencing a remarkably complete genome from a 50,000-year-old bone fragment of a female Neandertal found in Vindija Cave in Croatia, researchers report a new trove of gene variants that living people outside of Africa obtained from Neandertals. Some of this DNA could influence cholesterol levels, the accumulation of belly fat, and the risk of schizophrenia and other diseases.Disturbing allegations of sexual harassment in Antarctica leveled at noted scientistBoston University is investigating sexual harassment complaints made against a prominent Antarctic geologist by two of his former graduate students. The women allege that David Marchant, then an assistant professor, harassed them during different research expeditions starting 2 decades ago, while they were isolated in small groups in the Antarctic. In supporting documents and interviews, several other women report similar treatment from Marchant in that period. But other women he has worked with defend Marchant, saying they do not recognize the man described in the complaints. Watch a supercomputer design a radical new wing for airplanesWhen engineers want to make an object weigh less, they literally cut corners. Using a tool called topology optimization, they enlist computers to snip as much material as possible from the inside of objects, reducing the number of spokes on a bicycle wheel, for example. But current methods can only optimize simple objects such as brackets and pipes. Now, a team of researchers says it has created a new method of paring down large-scale objects, such as plane wings.Migrating researchers are cited the most, study findsResearchers who are on the move are cited on average 40% more than those who aren’t, according to an analysis published this week. The study analyzed 14 million scholarly papers published between 2008 and 2015 by nearly 16 million individual authors. They found about 4%—more than 595,000 scholars—to be “mobile,” meaning they had affiliations with academic institutions in more than one nation. Of these, roughly 73% retained a footing at their original institution while gaining additional international affiliations. The remaining 27% became detached from the institution in their original country after moving and were the most highly cited, the study finds.This giant Australian insect is still alive, despite being declared extinct nearly a century agoLong thought to be extinct, Lord Howe Island stick insects (Dryococelus australis) are actually alive and well. The 15-centimeter-long bugs once thrived only on Lord Howe Island, near Australia. But after a ship accidentally introduced black rats to the island about a century ago, the stick insects disappeared, only to be found 40 years later on a nearby volcanic sea stack. But these critters didn’t look like old stick insect museum specimens, leaving scientists wondering. Now, a DNA analysis shows that the live sticks and dead specimens are the same species.Why was this 16th-century Scottish village buried in sand?The farming town of Broo on Scotland’s Shetland Islands was no stranger to extreme weather. Located on an archipelago just south of the Arctic Circle, its inhabitants had braved lashing winds and bitterly cold winters. But it was something else that did Broo in: sand. Beginning around 1665, a series of sandstorms like nothing seen before buffeted the island, burying homes, destroying fertile soil, and eventually forcing the townspeople to flee. Now, scientists think they know what caused the freak weather event—and why it left neighboring towns relatively unscathed. Top stories: Science Nobels, a giant insect back from the dead, and how Neandertal DNA makes you fat This year’s science NobelsTwo years ago, physicists detected for the first time the infinitesimal ripples in space called gravitational waves caused by the merger of two black holes. This observation fulfilled a century-old prediction from Albert Einstein and opened up a whole new way to explore the heavens. This week, three leaders of the massive experiment that made the discovery received the Nobel Prize in Physics. The Physiology or Medicine Prize recognized work on how several genes work together to control the basic circadian clock, encoding proteins that build up during the night and are broken down during the day. And three pioneers of a technique called cryo–electron microscopy won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The technique helped visualize biomolecules—everything from the needles that bacteria use to attack cells to the structure of Zika virus—with unprecedented detail.Is your Neandertal DNA making your belly fat? Ancient genome offers clues Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email (LEFT TO RIGHT): THE SXS (SIMULATING EXTREME SPACETIMES) PROJECT; C. BICKEL/SCIENCE; TOMISLAV KRANJCIC/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS last_img read more

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As sea levels rise Bangladeshi islanders must decide between keeping the water

July 20, 2019

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Polder 32 For Jaharul Sardar, a rice farmer in rural Bangladesh, the perils of living behind a wall hit home one cloudy May afternoon in 2009. Sardar was standing beside his fields when he heard neighbors cry out in alarm. A black hill of seawater was sweeping toward him. Sardar’s wife and 5-year-old son clambered atop the embankment that stands guard over his mud-floored house. Instead of joining them, he dashed inside to rescue a suitcase stuffed with cash and property records.Within seconds, waves slammed into the house. Sardar was trapped. Water pushed the structure, with him inside it, into an adjacent pond. His wife pulled him to safety, soaked but alive.For Sardar, relief was short-lived. That day marked the beginning of fierce floods. Each day the tide poured in through the breached wall, drowning fields and homes in saltwater, and then withdrew and left a blanket of mud. “During high tide it was all underwater. And during low tide it was like [a] desert,” Sardar says. 20 A woman walks by a canal linking the Kobadak River to a polder. Connecting the canal and the river causes flooding in one place that might protect land elsewhere. Email Bay of Bengal Beel However, Goodbred also found cause for optimism. Land just outside the polder was 10 centimeters above the typical high tide, suggesting that, without human intervention, natural sediment deposition would keep the land above all but the highest tides. Furthermore, the disastrous flooding here had an upside, delivering enough new silt to raise land inside the walls more than a third of a meter on average.That outcome led Goodbred to suggest letting some water in. In the short term, controlled flooding into the polders might be painful. In the long run, it could elevate land and minimize damage from future breaches. In a world of rising sea levels and bigger storms, Goodbred says, “I think that has to be a part of any long-term solution.”Bending to the water’s willIt’s a seductive idea. It’s also not a popular one for many who would have to live with the consequences, including government officials. “We don’t need to raise the land. Farmers are not demanding it,” says Abdul Hannan, the top engineer in this region for the Bangladesh Water Development Board, the powerful government agency that manages the country’s water.Yet about 30 kilometers inland, farmers spurred an experiment to do just that. It’s much like the prescription Goodbred offered—use controlled flooding to raise sunken land and drain polders—but this experiment began almost by accident in the early 1990s.These inland polders are designed to protect against flooding by seawater driven far up river channels during high tides. After the embankments were built, those rivers, with smaller, slower currents than rivers closer to the coast, started clogging with silt that would otherwise have settled on land. Meanwhile, the polders began to sink. After monsoon rains, water in the polders failed to drain through small canals into surrounding, now sluggish, rivers. Farms and towns inside stewed in stagnant water for months.Local ingenuity and desperation prompted farmers on two river systems in southwest Bangladesh to cut gaps in embankments to open the polders to the river. The government cracked down with arrests. Then, something unexpected happened—exactly the outcome Goodbred later saw at Polder 32. Within a few years, the land inside the inland polders had risen a meter or more. The rivers grew deeper. Waterlogging eased.Since then, government officials have tried to replicate the success of those first improvised projects. The latest test for what’s known as “tidal river management,” or TRM, began in 2015. A construction crew cut through the embankment of a polder lining the Kobadak River. Workers then dug a canal joining the river outside the polder to a 660-hectare depression inside it—a wetland known as a beel.Visit today and the experiment’s effects are evident. Parts of the beel, called Beel Pakhimara, have gained half a meter of fresh land. The river runs faster, as sediment is deposited in the beel instead of the riverbed. As the main river channel grows deeper, water is once again draining from nearby polders.The endangered Ganges River dolphin has put in appearances since the flow returned, says Jahin Shams Sakkhar, an official with Uttaran, a local organization that has campaigned for projects like this one. “The more open it is, the more good it is for nature and for people,” he says.Yet the filling of the beel hasn’t gone entirely as planned, partly because “so far, the whole TRM process has been based on assumptions,” says Shah Alam Khan, a civil engineer at BUET, who is helping lead a Dutch-funded study of the Kobadak River project. The polder’s land rose unevenly, with the area near the canal benefiting the most. Engineers are still deciphering sediment dynamics and considering how best to direct flooding, Khan says. Silt TANMOY BHADURI Winners and losersThe greatest challenge to opening the polders isn’t the engineering, it’s the people. Can some be persuaded to accept flooding on their land for years so that others can live flood-free?Winners and losers are scattered around Beel Pakhimara. While farmers in nearby towns gather the rice harvest in golden fields now free from waterlogging, the beel is a desolate land of gray and pale green. Those who once farmed it have seen their rice paddies, fish farms, and ponds turn into a dumping ground for river sediment. It will remain that way until the canal is closed in approximately 2020, when the beel has filled with sediment and can be returned to cultivation.Outside a small compound of brick and mud huts tucked against the embankment, 35-year-old Hanif Sardar (no relation to Jaharul) has little good to say about the project that’s supposed to help rescue his country’s land. He tried to get paid for the fifth of a hectare of land in the beel where he once grew rice that fed his family, he explains. “The government official says, ‘Leave the application, something will happen. Don’t worry.’ But nothing happened,” he says bitterly. “All the big landowners got the money. But the small landowners are not getting compensation.”The waterlogging that left a third of a meter of water in his yard for months each year ended in 2016. But that’s outweighed by the family’s loss of farmland. “The disadvantage is more,” says Hanif ‘s uncle, Amzad Sardar, “and the advantage is few.”To understand why some citizens turn against TRM projects, Mahmuda Mutahara, a Bangladeshi who recently earned her Ph.D., has spent much of the past 5 years traversing the region’s pothole-riddled roads, often on the back of a motorcycle. Questioning residents, government officials, and others, she found government agencies disconnected from locals, spawning distrust and anger that have derailed controlled flooding attempts, sometimes spectacularly. A polder’s embankmenttraps the river insidenarrow banks. Silt fillsthe river, shrinking it, andthe walls deprive landinside the polder of freshsoil and keep monsoonrains from draining out. Bangladesh, a vast river delta that barely rises above the sea at the best of times, is buffeted by natural forces including flooding rivers and cyclones blowing in from the bay. Over decades, the country has developed defenses: warning systems, storm shelters, salt-resistant crops, and 139 polders near the coast—a 5700-kilometer network of walls to protect farmland from inundation. But humanmade infrastructure is not infallible and can cause problems of its own. That’s starkly apparent across the country’s polders, which have disrupted a fragile standoff between water and land and are now straining to hold back the water. As climate change compounds that threat with rising seas and stronger storms, Bangladeshis who have spent years building barricades are considering what was once unthinkable: letting the water in. It’s resilience by bending, not resisting. And it’s tougher to do than it sounds.Other countries are trying similar approaches. Vietnam recently adopted plans to allow more flooding in the upper reaches of the Mekong delta. The Netherlands, renowned for building some of the world’s most sophisticated sea walls, is adapting suburbs for controlled river flooding. On the other end of the spectrum sits Indonesia, which is planning a $40 billion, 40-kilometer-long sea wall to shield its capital city, Jakarta, from the Java Sea.Here in a country the size of Iowa that’s home to 165 million people, experiments in resilience underscore the challenges of rearranging a crowded landscape. “You can’t remove the polders now,” says Anisul Haque, a hydraulic modeler at the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET) in Dhaka who studies coastal flooding. “So what can you do?” More than 12 years after Hurricane Katrina, scientists are learning what makes some survivors more resilient than others Trapped river Km 0 Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Warren CornwallMar. 1, 2018 , 2:00 PM Polder walls The 4-meter-high earthen wall that failed dated from the 1960s. It encircles 80 square kilometers of land to create a massive “polder”—an artificial island surrounded by the vast tidal rivers that extend like thick tendrils from the nearby Bay of Bengal. At 66, Sardar remembers conditions before the wall, when flooding during very high tides was the norm here. Until that fateful day in 2009, the flooding appeared to be banished. 1. The world’s fourth largestriver system pours sedimentinto the Bay of Bengal. In war zones and refugee camps, researchers are putting resilience interventions to the test The cycle of silt Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe From stealing genes to regrowing limbs, how life finds a way to survive and thrive Special package: Resilience A series of Science articles examines ways of coping with natural disasters, war and displacement, and climate change—not to mention resilience tactics in nature. Beel Pakhimara River Water meets land in Bangladesh Many Bangladeshis live on artificial islands called polders, behind walls built to protect the low-lying islands from floods. But the polders disrupt sediment deposits and face climate change pressures, and it’s harder than ever to keep water out. Residents are considering new ways to protect the polders and their land. More from Resilience 2. In the southwest, some of the silt is pushedinland by tidal rivers that flow “upstream” fromthe ocean during high tides. The flood treatment Engineers cut into theembankment, and the riverflows into a depressioninside a polder called a beel.Sediment is scoured fromthe river and deposited in thebeel or washed downstream,opening the river channeland raising the polder’s land. As sea levels rise, Bangladeshi islanders must decide between keeping the water out—or letting it in Bangladesh J. You and V. Altounian/Science Government water officials “are not so much interested to talk to the local people,” to learn about their wishes and explain how, in the long run, they might benefit, says Mutahara, who lives in Dhaka and studied environmental science at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. “That is the problem.” To illustrate her point, Mutahara shares a story that for her is emblematic of the tangled social forces that make such work fraught with tensions.Over the past decade, a rotating series of TRM projects on the nearby Hari River have repeatedly gone awry. Flooding in one beel dragged on years longer than planned. Farmers pressed for compensation for lost harvests. Fish-farming interests resisted the injection of fresh silt because it would fill their ponds. In 2012, a crowd rioted as government officials prepared to flood a beel there. The government suspended work and has yet to return.Six years later, the Hari River problems remain, and so do the charred shells of three cars that rioters set on fire. “If, within the next 2 or 3 years, they do not do TRM upstream, the river will be silted up completely,” Mutahara says.The government has tried to learn from its mistakes, says Probir Kumar Goshwami, lead engineer at the Bangladesh Water Development Board’s office in nearby Jessore. Last year, the government set up a temporary office near Beel Pakhimara where people could file for compensation. Water management officials are meeting more with locals. This year, the water agency plans to resume work on the beel at the center of the 2012 riot.Despite some government resistance to TRM, Goshwami says there’s no better alternative for those walled-off villages. “The tidal river management is the only solution.”Could controlled flooding be exported downstream to places like Polder 32? The chronic, low-level flooding on the Kobadak River differs from the threat of catastrophic, storm-induced flooding closer to the sea. And yet both places have something in common: a need to build up land.As of now, no specific plan exists to bend to the water’s will. Even a sort of “TRM lite”—a compartmentalized flooding in which small sections of polders are opened to raise elevation bit by bit—hasn’t gained traction, says Haque, who has used computer models to study solutions to coastal vulnerability. Residents would have to be persuaded to live for years with flooded land. Reluctant government officials would need to embrace the approach. “This is a social problem,” he says.On Polder 32, the fields are dry today. It was one of the first places to get new, higher walls under the World Bank initiative. The breaches in the dike were closed in 2011.Jaharul Sardar’s view across the water, however, is a reminder that walls cannot erase risk. The land inside the polder is visibly lower than the shoreline outside it. But as he strolls barefoot atop the freshly rebuilt embankment, he feels safe for now. “If we have good embankments and cyclone shelters,” he says, “we can survive.”This project was supported with a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. The dance between water and landRivers are the midwives of Bangladesh. The Ganges and Brahmaputra pour from the Himalayas and converge with the Meghna River to form the world’s fourth largest drainage, which flows into the Bay of Bengal. Monsoon rains routinely put a quarter of the country underwater. The flooding brings hardship, but it also nurtures the rice that feeds one of the most densely populated nations on Earth.The country itself is born from those rivers. An estimated 1 billion tons of sand and silt flow downstream every year and settles in the delta, counteracting relentless erosion. Geologically, Bangladesh is a giant sandbox, 90 meters deep in places.Ainun Nishat knows those rivers with an intimacy earned by spending 4 decades studying them. Sitting in his third-floor office at BRAC University’s Centre for Climate Change and Environmental Research in Dhaka, the engineer describes how good intentions have brought unexpected consequences.Polders—the name is borrowed from the Dutch, who used a similar strategy to carve farmland from marshes—were first built in Bangladesh in the 1960s. But although polders allow more intensive farming, Nishat says, “They are also a problem.” The walls impede the natural movement of water and sediment. Rivers now funneled between artificial embankments are filling with silt. Land inside the polders, starved of new soil that would otherwise flow in, is sinking. Polders are turning into bathtubs that, if something goes wrong, can fill with water.Meanwhile, sea level is projected to rise 0.4 to 1.5 meters on the Bangladesh coast by 2100. Episodes of extremely high water driven by storms and tides, which today occur once a decade, will probably happen three to 15 times every year at the end of the century, according to a 2015 study by U.K. and Bangladeshi researchers. That trend will put the polders and their inhabitants at even greater risk.The devastation of Sardar’s polder, Polder 32, starkly illustrates the dangers posed by that confluence of climate change and decades of hydraulic tinkering. That day in 2009, a wave of water originating from nearby Cyclone Aila combined with strong currents to burst through embankments on several polders. The disaster left more than 150 dead and $270 million in damages in Bangladesh.Many believed the answer was to strengthen the polders. In 2013, the World Bank committed $400 million to raise embankments on 17 polders that are home to nearly 800,000 people. It’s a first step in a push by the Bangladeshi government to build up the entire polder system with an eye toward rising seas.What Steve Goodbred, a coastal geologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, saw when he visited Polder 32 after the storm pointed to a different approach. Goodbred and a research team found that land inside the polder was more than a meter below the average high tide in the area. As long as the walls held up, the sinking went largely unremarked upon. But the cyclone laid bare the risks. “It was, ‘Wow, no wonder the flooding was so bad,’” says Goodbred, who has spent the past 2 decades studying the Bangladesh delta. TANMOY BHADURI Silt accumulates in thebottom of the beel insteadof the river. Flooding from a siltedriver is slow to drainout of the polder. CanalPolder wallPolder RiverBeels Mangrove swamps Polder 32 resident Jaharul Sardar, who narrowly escaped a 2009 flood, remembers when the walls ringing his home kept him safe.last_img read more

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Suspect Arrested In Missing Utah Students Death

July 20, 2019

first_imgPolice in Utah arrested a person on Friday in connection to a local college student who went missing nearly two weeks ago, according to the Salt Lake City Tribune. Ayoola Ajayi was taken into custody as a person of interest before he was placed under arrest under suspicion that he killed MacKenzie Lueck, who was first reported missing June 17. UPDATED: 5:38 p.m. EDT — Police in Utah have released the mugshot of the man suspected of killing a college student who went missing in Salt Lake Cty nearly two weeks ago. Ayoola Ajayi was arrested on Friday and charged with the murder of MacKenzie Lueck after officials were able to determine that the “charred remains” found in the suspect’s back yard belonged to the 23-year-old college student. Photos online showed that the suspect is a Black man. Lueck, 23, is a white woman. SLCPD took one person into custody this morning regarding the MacKenzie Lueck case. We will be providing an update at 11:30 a.m at the Public Safety Building. #MacKenzieLueck— SLC Police Dept. (@slcpd) June 28, 2019 JUST IN: Salt Lake City Police release mugshot of Ayoola Ajayi, suspect in kidnapping and murder of Mackenzie Lueck pic.twitter.com/3gN2P2XH8z— Breaking911 (@Breaking911) June 28, 2019 Twitter Crowns Kamala Harris Winner Of The Second Democratic Debate Neighbors told police Ajayi was in his backyard burning items on June 16 and 17. Inside Edition reported that Lueck’s “charred remains” were found in Ajayi’s backyard.An arrest report showed that there was no bond being offered for Ajayi. US-VOTE-2020-DEMOCRATS-DEBATE This is a breaking news story that will be updated as more information becomes available.SEE ALSO:Howard University Student And Aspiring Dentist Killed By Car Being Chased By PoliceRickey Smiley Tapped To Take Over Morning Show When Tom Joyner Retires BREAKING: Jail booking information from @SLCOMetroJail on Ayoola Ajayi. #MackenzieLueck @KUTV2News https://t.co/te0N2X2VBY pic.twitter.com/XUgi1EIhjH— Jeremy Harris (@JeremyHarrisTV) June 28, 2019center_img Original post: Ayoola “Aj” Ajayi is now being held at the jail on suspicion of Aggravated Murder, Aggravated Kidnapping, and desecration. @SLCountyDA will review the @slcpd case and deteine if charges will be filed. That process may take a few days. @KUTV2News pic.twitter.com/A4eeHvm5Sq— Jeremy Harris (@JeremyHarrisTV) June 28, 2019According to journalist Chris Jones, Ajayi penned a novel called “Forge Identity” that features “a fictional character who watches 2 people being burned by angry mobs.” There was an emerging xenophobic narrative on social media after it was reported that Ajayi was an immigrant from Africa.It was still unclear how their paths came to cross on the night of June 17, when Lueck went missing from a park. The two may have met via a dating app.“The college senior’s social media accounts reveal that she considered herself a sugar baby, and boasted about having at least two unidentified sugar daddies which she found through online sites Seeking Arrangement and Tinder,” the Daily Mail reported earlier this week.“DailyMail.com obtained screenshots of Lueck’s posts made nearly three months ago in a private Facebook group where Lueck gave advice on how she finds sugar daddies – wealthy older men who lavish younger women with gifts and money in return for company or sexual favors,” the news outlet reported.“Try tinder and be blunt about it,” one comment attributed to Lueck says. “Mine says ‘I want a SD/SB relationship with a real connection,’” she wrote. “If [they] don’t know what a SD/SB is, tell them bluntly sugar daddy and sugar baby. But if they don’t know, they aren’t really worth your time,” her comment said.She continued: “Set your age preferences from 35+. You’ll have the most luck there. Private message me, if you have more questions! I have experience.” BREAKING: Missing Utah college student MacKenzie Lueck is dead; suspect Ayoola Ajayi charged with aggravated murder. Charred human tissue consistent with missing student found in suspect’s backyard.(AP Photo) pic.twitter.com/5qvnRzAxTh— Breaking911 (@Breaking911) June 28, 2019“Ajayi, 31, was being booked into jail on suspicion of aggravated murder, aggravated kidnapping, desecration of a body and obstruction of justice after a SWAT team took him into custody Friday morning at a West Temple apartment complex,” the local news outlet reported. Police said during a briefing on Friday that was the last time the suspect would be referred to by name. Ayoola Ajayi , MacKenzie Lueck , missing Utah student Suspected murderer of #MackenzieLueck self published this book where #AyoolaAjayi writes about a fictional character who watches 2 people being burned by angry mobs. pic.twitter.com/H36CUOehCL— Chris Jones (@jonesnews) June 28, 2019Heavy.com noted that the liner notes for the book included a bio that says: “Ayoola Ajayi was born and raised in Africa. He has been a salesman, an entrepreneur, and a writer. He has survived a tyrannical dictatorship, escaped a real life crime, traveled internationally, excelled professionally in several industries, and is currently curating a multi-platform advertising campaign for his debut novel, Forge Identity, a sample of which can be found on Kindle, Amazon, Facebook, and any current social media. He lives in salt lake.” WATCH NOW: Utah authorities announce charges against man in the murder of missing college student Mackenzie Lueck https://t.co/7wxmq1XFj5 pic.twitter.com/XfUfAFuavh— CBS News (@CBSNews) June 28, 2019According to the Daily Mail, Ajayi is a “former Army IT specialist who owns a home five miles from a park” where Lueck went missing from.Lueck had returned from California to Salt Lake City on June 17 when she requested a car from her Lyft ridesharing app to take her “to Hatch Park in North Salt Lake, nearly 9 miles from her home near Trolley Square, where she met a person at about 3 a.m. and left,” Salt Lake Cty Tribune reported. Her parent reported her missing on the 20th.Police said phone records linked Ajayi to Lueck and that signals indicated their cellphones were in close proximity to each other when she went missing.Ajayi told police in an interview before Friday that he “texted Lueck on June 16 at about 6 p.m. but had no further contact with her,” the Tribune reported. “He said he didn’t know what Lueck looked like and said he hadn’t seen her photos or online profile.” However, police said Ajayi had multiple photos of Lueck.last_img read more

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Taylor water rates to change in December

July 19, 2019

first_imgNovember 5, 2018 Taylor water rates to change in December By Toni Gibbons At the end of the public hearing for proposed water rate changes at the Taylor Town Council meeting on Nov. 1, in which no one from the public spoke, a resolution forSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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From the desert to the ocean Arizona Sake gets rave reviews

July 19, 2019

first_imgMarch 30, 2019 From the desert to the ocean, Arizona Sake gets rave reviews Yoshiyuki Sasaki, the executive sushi chef and manager at Sushi Shiono in Kailua Kona is a reknowned throughout the islands.Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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UK PM candidate Mark Harper I want a new Brexit deal

July 19, 2019

first_img Advertising Aegean lessons UK’s Boris Johnson declines to comment on plan to facilitate a no-deal Brexit “My preference is to get a new deal. However, no deal must not be ruled out, should we be faced with a choice between no deal and no Brexit,” Harper said, according to excerpts distributed by his office.“This is my plan – one that can be delivered. One thing I’m not promising, as much as I’d like, is that we will leave deal or no deal come October 31st. Why? It’s because I’m being straight with you and it just isn’t possible.” Related News Mark Harper , Brexit, New Brexit deal, UK Parliament,British Prime Minister Theresa May, brexit news, world news, Indian Express Mark Harper, one of the candidates vying to succeed British Prime Minister Theresa May, said he would seek a new Brexit deal. (Twitter)Mark Harper, one of the candidates vying to succeed British Prime Minister Theresa May, said he would seek a new Brexit deal and could not promise the exit would happen by Oct. 31. UK economy probably shrank for first time in seven years By Reuters |London | Updated: June 11, 2019 5:04:12 pm Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Triple suicide attack kills at least 30 in northeast Nigeria

July 19, 2019

first_img Advertising Nigeria signs Africa free trade agreement Five abducted Indian sailors in Nigeria rescued after over two months in captivity: Mansukh Mandaviya Explained: How India and the world are ageing suicide bombing in nigeria, nigeria suicide bombing, triple suicide attacks, triple suicide attacks in nigeria, nigeria triple suicide attacks, nigeria bomb blast, bomb blasts in nigeria, nigeria blasts, world news, Indian Express No group has yet claimed responsibility for the attack. (File)At least 30 people have been killed in a triple suicide attack in northeast Nigeria, state emergency services officials said on Monday. Related News By Reuters |Maiduguri | Updated: June 17, 2019 4:36:32 pm Three suicide bombers detonated explosives in the village of Konduga, 25km (15 miles) from Maiduguri, the state capital of Borno state, on Sunday night, village head Bulama Kalli said.Kalli said the attackers had targeted a place where villagers gathered to watch a soccer match on a large screen at about 19:50 GMT. More than 25 of those killed have so far been buried while several survivors have been taken to the hospital in Maiduguri.No group has yet claimed responsibility for the attack.The Boko Haram group and its Islamic State splinter group have often carried out suicide bombings targeting civilians in Borno state. Their attacks have claimed hundreds of thousands of lives and displaced millions of people. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Podcast Materials scientists mimic nature and how the appendix could hold the

July 19, 2019

first_imgRoger Smith/Flickr For a long time, Parkinson’s disease was thought to be merely a disorder of the nervous system. But in the past decade researchers have started to look elsewhere in the body for clues to this debilitating disease—particularly in the gut. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with Viviane Labrie of the Van Andel Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan, about new research suggesting people without their appendixes have a reduced risk of Parkinson’s. Labrie also describes the possible mechanism behind this connection.And host Sarah Crespi talks with Peter Fratzl of the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam, Germany, about what materials scientists can learn from nature. The natural world might not produce innovations like carbon nanotubes, but evolution has forged innumerable materials from very limited resources—mostly sugars, proteins, and minerals. Fratzl discusses how plants make time-release seedpods that are triggered by nothing but fire and rain, the amazing suckerin protein that comprises squid teeth, and how cicadas make their transparent, self-cleaning wings from simple building blocks.Fratzl’s review is part of a special section in Science on composite materials. Read the whole package, including a review on using renewables like coconut fiber for building cars and incorporating carbon nanotubes and graphene into composites.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download the transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Roger Smith/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

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Watch the worlds smallest bear copy its friends facial expressions

July 19, 2019

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Alex FoxMar. 21, 2019 , 10:00 AM Watch the world’s smallest bear copy its friends’ facial expressions Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Thirteen of the bears mirrored the facial expression of their roughhousing partner exactly within 1 second of seeing it, the researchers report today in Scientific Reports. The bears also surprised researchers with their social sensitivity—they made roughly 85% of their facial expressions while face to face with another bear.The presence of these sophisticated social behaviors in the solitary sun bear suggests, say the researchers, that facial mimicry may be more common than previously thought. It also challenges the idea that only animals with complex social lives can be copycats. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Humans are master impersonators—even infants can mimic the facial expressions of their friends and parents. Other socially sophisticated primates can copy others’ faces during play, with toothy grins bouncing from one gorilla or orangutan to the next. Now, scientists have captured video of the world’s smallest bear doing the same thing, the first time that a nonprimate has been shown to ape faces.Researchers took short videos of 22 sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) spontaneously playing together over several years at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre in Sandakan, Malaysia. This diminutive bear is elusive and solitary, spending most of its life roaming the forests of Southeast Asia. But bears at the center engaged in hundreds of mostly gentle play fights, even though the enclosure was large enough that they could have kept to themselves.The researchers divided the bears’ facial expressions into two types: an open-mouthed gape and an open mouth with a wrinkled nose and exposed teeth. Then, they watched the 3- to 5-minute videos to see whether the bears matched their playmates’ facial expressions.last_img read more

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Gorillas have developed humanlike social structure controversial study suggests

July 19, 2019

first_img Email Wildlife Conservation Society Young gorillas from different families may become friends when their groups meet to dine in the wild. Gorillas have developed humanlike social structure, controversial study suggests A bold claim about gorilla societies is drawing mixed reviews. Great apes, humans’ closest evolutionary relatives, were thought to lack our social complexity. Chimpanzees, for example, form only small bands that are aggressive toward strangers. But based on years of watching gorillas gather in food-rich forest clearings, a team of scientists has concluded the apes have hierarchical societies similar to those of humans, perhaps to help them exploit rich troves of food.The finding, reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, challenges the prevailing notion that such sophisticated societies evolved relatively recently, after humans split from chimpanzees. Instead, these researchers say, the origins of such social systems extend at least as far back as the common ancestor of humans and gorillas, but were lost in chimpanzees.The group has presented “a pretty convincing case for a hierarchical social structure in gorillas,” says Richard Connor, a cetacean biologist and expert on dolphin society at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth. But because other primates that are not great apes—notably baboons, geladas, and colobine monkeys—show similar hierarchies, he’s not surprised they have turned up in gorillas, too. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Virginia MorellJul. 17, 2019 , 12:45 PM Gorillas spend most of their time in dense forests, travel great distances to a new home spot daily, and are slow to get used to observers, making their social lives hard to study. But western gorillas in the Republic of Congo gather periodically at swampy clearings in the forests to feed primarily on the highly abundant vegetation, but also on favorite and rare foods such as certain fig trees that produce massive amounts of fruit only every 3 to 5 years, says Robin Morrison, a zoologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom and the study’s lead author.By stationing themselves near the Mbeli Bai clearing in the Republic of Congo’s Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park, she and her colleagues gained an intimate view of gorilla social connections from 2010 to 2015. They added to their observations similar data collected by others in 2001–02 at the Lokoué clearing in Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Republic of Congo. By analyzing the frequency and duration of social interactions among the hundreds of gorillas that gathered at each site, the scientists discovered a multitiered hierarchy. Family units were nested inside larger social units in a pattern strikingly similar to modern human societies. At both sites, individual gorillas spent time not only with their immediate families, but also with an average of 13 extended family members—for example, cousins, aunts, and grandparents.Even more surprising, each ape interacted with some 39 other gorillas to whom they weren’t related. Sometimes, younger males gathered in “all-male bachelor groups,” Morrison said in a press statement, comparing the overall gatherings to dynamics in a village. Her team’s analysis revealed that more than 80% of the close associations were between more distantly related—or even unrelated—silverbacks, as dominant male gorillas are called. Gorillas “clearly had preferences,” she said.“If we think of these associations in a human-centric way, the time spent in each other’s company might be analogous to an old friendship,” she added. The ability to form friendships and cooperate with unrelated individuals is considered integral to the evolution of humans’ “social brains.”Kim Hill, an evolutionary anthropologist at Arizona State University in Tempe, rejects such parallels to humans. “[T]he extreme social brain hypothesis doesn’t claim other primates don’t form hierarchically increasing groupings,” Hill wrote in an email to Science. “It focuses on the size of the largest human groupings.” Humans recognize and remember details about more than 1000 individuals, he notes, whereas the “highest level groups in the gorillas are not even as big as large chimp communities.” Morrison agrees that ape societies are not comparable to those of humans at the highest social tiers, but she says her group’s discovery reveals that some elements of our multitiered systems are older than previously believed.Connor, for his part, doubts that foraging drove the emergence of these complex social associations. More likely, he says, these “are based on cooperative defense”—as they are in other primate societies and in dolphins. Morrison says she’ll watch for evidence of that as she continues to monitor the gorilla gatherings.last_img read more

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CJI Ranjan Gogoi calls for more CSR spending for social justice

July 19, 2019

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Top News By Express News Service |New Delhi | Published: July 13, 2019 1:24:37 am Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield “It would be a narrow reading of the Constitution to say that only the state has to look into issues of social justice. It is a fundamental duty of all citizens,” he said. He identified juvenile justice and education of girls as two key areas where CSR intervention would yield results.The lecture was organised by Assocham India on the theme “Social Justice and Corporate Social Responsibility”. The CJI also released a special publication on the life of the former president.The first edition of the lecture was delivered in August last year by then CJI Dipak Misra. Advertising CJI Ranjan Gogoi calls for more CSR spending for social justice CJI Ranjan Gogoi identified juvenile justice and education of girls as two key areas where CSR intervention would yield results. (Express photo by Prem Nath Pandey/File)At the second annual Dr A P J Abdul Kalam Memorial Lecture on Friday, Chief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi called for increased CSR spending to promote social justice in the country. Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Researchers discover biomarker for most common type of heart failure

July 19, 2019

first_img Source:https://www.cedars-sinai.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 1 2018A team led by a Cedars-Sinai physician-scientist has discovered a biomarker–a protein found in the blood–for the most common type of heart failure, a new study published today in JAMA Cardiology shows.Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) affects more than 6.5 million Americans each year. And now, thanks to the discovery of the first-ever biomarker for HFpEF, a simple blood test can reveal whether a patient’s heart is not making enough of an important protein. If the protein levels are decreased, the biomarker signal increases and physicians will be able to diagnose heart failure sooner, prescribe corrective medicines and prevent further disease progression.”By the time heart failure symptoms develop, the critical window for corrective therapy has typically closed,” said Robin Shaw, MD, PhD, the Wasserman Endowed Chair in Cardiology and professor of Medicine at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai and principal investigator on the study. “Our discovery allows us to not only diagnose the disease sooner, but also to treat patients before that critical period of early intervention for lifesaving care has closed.”Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is a condition where the heart can contract, but has problems relaxing–limiting the heart’s ability to fill with blood between each beat–and therefore lowers the amount of blood moving forward with each contraction. Prior to the discovery of the biomarker, clinicians had to wait for patients to have symptoms to make a diagnosis of HFpEF and had to use an echocardiogram that measured how well the heart relaxed. There was no method to gauge the health of the heart muscle before symptoms developed or determine the severity of disease once symptoms were present.The biomarker–named cBIN1 Score, or CS for short–allows doctors to measure muscle deterioration and measure a protein that regulates the heart’s ability to both contract and relax. As the protein decreases, CS increases, serving as an indication of onset heart failure. The CS biomarker can be measured using a simple blood draw.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsThe CS biomarker is designed to be used in an outpatient clinic setting. For patients with known HFpEF, doctors can draw a CS level and use it to both guide current care, including medication adjustments, and predict the chances of a patient being admitted to the hospital in the next 12 months.”More broadly, this discovery will allow the most at-risk patients–including older patients and patients with high blood pressure, diabetes or dyslipidemia–to be checked during an annual exam from their primary care physician,” said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Smidt Heart Institute. “This pivotal research has the potential to impact millions of people and serve as a critical tool for preventive heart care.”Symptoms of heart failure typically appear as fatigue, fluid weight gain, leg swelling and shortness of breath. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is typically diagnosed in elderly people or those living with high blood pressure, diabetes, elevated cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, anemia, iron deficiency or diabetes. Its prevalence is projected to rise drastically over the coming decades. Previous studies have shown that women represent the majority of patients diagnosed with the disease.As next steps, Cedars-Sinai researchers plan on identifying specialty populations in which the CS biomarker could be useful, including sex-based differences, those who have undergone a heart transplant or valve replacement, as well as individuals with no known heart disease or risk factors.last_img read more

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Copy number variants linked with schizophrenialike subtype of bipolar disorder

July 18, 2019

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 25 2019A genome-wide association study in Biological Psychiatry examines the role of copy number variants in subtypes of bipolar disorderA form of rare genomic structural variation called copy number variants (CNVs) may be more closely associated with schizophrenia than bipolar disorder. A new study published in Biological Psychiatry failed to find that CNVs were associated broadly with risk for bipolar disorder. However, schizoaffective disorder, which is a hybrid of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, had higher rates of CNVs compared with controls and other bipolar disorder subtypes.”This study sheds important new light on the heterogeneity of bipolar disorder. It suggests an important new mechanism linking the biology of the most severely disabling form of bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, to that of schizophrenia,” said John Krystal, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share many symptoms and genetic characteristics, but the contribution of CNVs to genetic risk has only been confirmed in schizophrenia. Although some studies have previously reported increased CNVs in bipolar disorder, the new genome-wide study, which included 6,353 bipolar disorder cases and 8,656 controls, did not find strong support for any of these.”In this paper, we can strongly conclude that these variants do not make a substantial contribution to risk of bipolar disorder broadly. However, we provide some evidence that CNVs do contribute to risk of a more ‘schizophrenia-like’ subtype of bipolar disorder and that this does not seem to be predominantly driven by symptoms of psychosis,” said Douglas Ruderfer, PhD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Tennessee, a senior author of the study.Related StoriesPatients with bipolar disorder are seven times more likely to develop Parkinson’sNew machine-learning method more precisely quantifies a known indicator for psychosisBrain activation patterns may help identify people at risk for developing bipolar spectrum disorderNo differences in CNVs were found between subtypes of bipolar I disorder with and without psychosis. The lack of connection between CNVs and psychosis led the authors to suggest that these rare genetic alterations may instead contribute to the nuances that differentiate psychotic illnesses, including bipolar disorder with psychosis, schizoaffective bipolar, and schizophrenia.”Our findings diverge from previous studies of common genetic variation that show genetic risk of schizophrenia is associated with risk of psychosis in bipolar disorder. These observations support the notion that different classes of genetic variation contribute to different domains of psychopathology, and suggest that the combination of genetic variants in a given individual create his or her unique symptom profile,” said lead author Alexander Charney, MD, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York.The symptoms of bipolar disorder vary between people, and the subtypes of the disorder are characterized by differences in strength and timing of the symptoms. The findings that CNVs are not associated with bipolar disorder as a whole, but rather a subtype of the disorder, provide insight into how symptom variation arises within the disease and highlights that considering these different subgroups as a single diagnosis might overlook important differences that define them.Source: https://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

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