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Lampard says he’d ‘never boss Spurs’ after ex-Chelsea chief Jose joins rivals

first_imgFRANK LAMPARD has given a “firm no” to ever bossing Tottenham – after fellow Chelsea legend Jose Mourinho took the job.Stamford Bridge chief Lampard says London rivalry built up over 13 years playing for the Blues means he would not consider managing big neighbours Spurs and Arsenal.3 Frank Lampard won the Premier League three times as a Chelsea player under Jose MourinhoCredit: Times Newspapers Ltd3 Ex-Chelsea chief Frank Lampard is preparing for his first game as Spurs manager, at West Ham on Saturday afternoonCredit: Getty – ContributorBut Lamps insists he understands Mourinho’s decision because Tottenham will be the ex-Manchester United and Real Madrid chief’s EIGHTH club as a manager.Asked if he could take charge of Spurs one day, Lampard smiled and replied: “I can firmly say no. And you can replay that it ten years, or whenever you want! No, it wouldn’t happen.But I think things are different. Jose Mourinho has worked for a lot of football clubs and you have to respect his right to work.’CLOSE TO MY HEART'”On the other hand i was here for 13 years as a player, have an absolute deep feeling for the club, and I obviously went to Manchester City for a year at the end of my career.But Chelsea is certainly very close to my heart. Hence why I’m so proud to manage this club.”And hence why I wouldn’t manage Tottenham, and that’s no disrespect to Tottenham.”As third-placed Chelsea prepare for Saturday evening’s trip to champions City, Lamps added: “I’ve got a lot of friends who are Tottenham fans and Arsenal fans etc.”But sometimes there are feelings when you are in it about some things that you wouldn’t do.3″I’m not being disrespectful to the club, but just because of what Chelsea has given me over my time as a player and now. It’s not on my list!”Chelsea will move four points clear of Pep Guardiola’s City if they win at the Eithad.And Lampard claims he wants to emulate Guardila’s success – but must be patient.He said of City: “The levels they have reached have been incredible.most read in footballTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’NEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by Celtic”For us to be in that position, I am pleased with.”But I want more. It’s not the end story, they are a strong outfit.”I won’t make huge judgements on tomorrow, our story is three months in the making.”Jose Mourinho meets Son and Tottenham players in first training session at the clublast_img read more

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Favorites again

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netSan Miguel Beer enters yet another PBA Philippine Cup title series starting Friday to try and put a lock on the distinction of being the best all-Filipino team of all time.The Beermen have beaten the best teams in their run of titles in the last three seasons, and with Magnolia showing that it is one of the best sides this year, the Hotshots are the ones standing in the way toward San Miguel’s stab at an unprecedented place in history.ADVERTISEMENT No team has even won this conference four straight years, and with the Beermen healthy and driven to perform, they are—as in the last three years—installed as the solid bets in this best-of-seven series that starts at 7 p.m. at Smart Araneta Coliseum on Friday.“We’re used to the pressure; the players are used to the pressure,” San Miguel’s Leo Austria said when asked if gunning for that piece of league history would add weight on the shoulders of the Beermen.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“This team has been through a lot and it made them tougher,” he added. “That (failed) Grand Slam (bid) last season was one of them, and we all learned from that.”Magnolia is back in a title series for the first time since its Grand Slam in 2014. The franchise’s dynasty ended after that, and, interestingly enough, San Miguel’s started after Austria took over. Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Generika serves a huge dose of Ramdin to trip Cignal The Hotshots needed to really work hard on making it this far after several close calls last season, needing to endure NLEX for six physical games before prevailing and doing it without their best post defender in Marc Pingris.They will also come into Game 1 off just two days’ rest, and after giving San Miguel scouts a glimpse of their best in the last two games against the Road Warriors.“It’s the Finals, we have no choice but to be ready mentally and physically,” Magnolia coach Chito Victolero said, though he wished to have had more time for his players to rest.San Miguel has had five days’ rest, something which Austria feels could work both ways for them.“We will lose some momentum, unlike them (Hotshots) who will be playing right away after a good game (against NLEX in Game 6),” Austria said. “But the rest could also work for us, because my starters averaged 36 minutes in the semifinals.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims View comments Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ “Yes, they (San Miguel scouts) saw our strengths in the last series. They have a good team in doing that,” he admitted. “But it will be our adjustments that they have no idea of. Those adjustments will be crucial.”This title series stint is also a validation for Victolero, who got appointed to the post without any fanfare—and to the surprise of many—after never having a winning season as a coach in any level in the past.He has gotten this Magnolia team to function like a well-oiled machine and has made the Hotshots the No. 1 defensive team in the conference.Victolero has stuck with his belief, a belief that he said he has been instilling in his players’ minds ever since he took over.“I keep telling them that if we want to reach the championship (series), we need to play defense,” Victolero said.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism MOST READlast_img read more

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Kings win see-saw shootout

first_imgThe Kings’ future is with its youth, and before Saturday’s game they dumped a struggling veteran. Oleg Tverdovsky, who had been a healthy scratch in the last nine games, cleared waivers and was assigned to the Kings’ American Hockey League affiliate in Manchester. N.H. Tverdovsky, a former All-Star defenseman, had been replaced of late by journeymen Kevin Dallman and Mike Weaver. Tverdovsky, due $2.5 million this next and next season, came over from Carolina in the trade that also brought highly touted prospect Jack Johnson to the Kings. Tverdovsky, and his bloated salary, represented the penance the Kings had to pay in order to land Johnson, who is considered a future NHL star. Johnson, a sophomore at Michigan, is dominating the NCAA ranks this season and the Kings will make a major push to sign him once the season ends, but that’s no sure bet. Johnson became available because he wouldn’t turn pro, and the Kings will have to convince Johnson’s family that he should leave school. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! LOS ANGELES – The Kings and Colorado Avalanche would both be out of the playoffs if the season ended today, but that didn’t prevent the two teams from putting on quite a show Saturday night. Colorado rallied from a two-goal first-period deficit to take the lead and the Kings rallied from a two-goal deficit in the final eight minutes to tie the game. Ending the wild game with a shootout seemed fitting, and that’s where the Kings claimed a 6-5 victory before an announced 18,118 at Staples Center. “(Kings goalie Sean Burke) made a great save so it took the pressure off me,” Brown said. “I’d been going with the deke, but goalies have been playing the deke, so I just decided to take a shot.” The Kings, who led 2-0 after the first period, trailed 5-3 when Milan Hejduk scored with 7:14 remaining. Lubomir Visnovksy scored a 5-on-3 goal with 4:46 left and Blake knocked in a rebound to tie it. The teams combined for six goals in the third period, which started in a 2-2 tie, but the highlight goal came early, when Anze Kopitar opened the scoring. Nine minutes into the first period, Kopitar came down the right side and cut to the net, around defenseman Karlis Skrastins, who tried to trip up Kopitar. It didn’t work, and Kopitar waited until goalie Peter Budaj went to his knees before firing a shot at a tough angle to give the Kings a 1-0 lead. The second assist on the goal went to 40-year-old Burke, who played his first NHL game on March 2, 1988, five-plus months after Kopitar’s birth. It was Burke’s 28th assist in 808 NHL games. center_img Rob Blake, who spent five-plus years with the Avalanche, broke a 16-game goalless streak when he tied the game with an empty-net goal with 3.9 seconds remaining. Each team scored three goals in its first five shootout chances but Dustin Brown ended it by beating Milan Hejduk with a wrist shot. The Kings broke a seven-game winless streak at Staples Center. last_img read more

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PATRICK GILDEA HAIRDRESSING NOMINATED FOR BEST HAIR SALON IN IRELAND

first_imgIt just gets better-after being awarded RSVP’s top Salon in Ulster the Patrick Gildea Hairdressing Team, Centre of Excellence have now been nominated and shortlisted for RSVP’s Top Salon in Ireland and this would not have been possible without your votes!We have just one week left to reach the top spot and be crowned the Best Salon in Ireland but we can’t do it without your help! We would really love you to vote for us so that we can bring this award to Donegal!Patrick said “We are so proud to represent Donegal in this prestigious award and would like to thank everyone that has voted. The good news is if you have voted for us already you can now vote for us again by clicking herehttp://rsvpmagazine.ie/poll-top-ten-best-in-hair-2015-as-voted-by-you/We are overwhelmed by all the support we have received so far and this award would be a great reflection on our team and the small business community in the North West. Thank you for your support! Don’t forget to share it with your friends! PATRICK GILDEA HAIRDRESSING NOMINATED FOR BEST HAIR SALON IN IRELAND was last modified: June 8th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BusinessFeaturesnewslast_img read more

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Chargers can’t cage ‘Cats

first_imgCOVINA – It is no secret the key to beating the Bonita High School boys basketball team is shutting down all-Valley forward Brock Zylstra. Charter Oak used a box-and-one defense to try and shut down Zylstra, but he got help from his teammates as the Bearcats defeated the Chargers 73-52 in their Miramonte League opener on Friday night. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGift Box shows no rust in San Antonio Stakes win at Santa AnitaRed-hot shooting from the 3-point line helped the Bearcats get off to a fast start in the first half. “We got hot in the second quarter,” Eckler said. “I was displeased with some of our defensive breakdowns in the second quarter, but our shooting canceled some of that out.” The Bearcats hit five consecutive 3-point attempts on their way to a 6-for-9 performance from beyond the arc. The Bearcats jumped to a 16-4 lead before the Chargers scored the final seven points of the first quarter. Mesropian hit a 3-pointer and Michael Johnson put in a layup at the buzzer to close the gap to 14-11 at the end of the quarter. “We’re used to seeing that defense,” Bearcats coach Greg Eckler said. “We are getting better with it and I’m sure we’ll see it again.” Zylstra led the Bearcats with 22 points, including 8 of 10 from the free throw line as sophomore Joey Mesropian kept a hand in his face most of the night. center_img The Bearcats switched to a full-court press and stretched their lead to 13 points at the half. “We gave up way too many easy points in the first half,” Eckler said. “I was very upset with that at halftime. We came out and fixed that problem.” Eckler made sure to stress to his team the importance of getting off to a good start in the second half. “I was trying to get my guys on their toes,” Eckler said. “Keeping them active and aggressive and looking for the next pick. The key was getting off to a good shooting start.” The Chargers got inside the Bearcats’ man-to-man defense for several easy layups, but the Bearcats shut that down in the second half. “We wore down in the second half,” Chargers coach Randy Thatcher said. “I think they played better, were more aggressive, better coached and that showed in the second half. They’re the best team in our league.” The Chargers stayed within range in the third quarter, but Eric Campa got hot off the bench in the fourth quarter and put the game out of reach. Campa finished with 10 points for the Bearcats, including a pair of 3-pointers. Mesropian led the Chargers with 15 points and Michael Johnson scored 13. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Rail bridge back on track

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! LA MIRADA – Two cities are inching closer to commencing work on a $44.5 million rail bridge to help reduce traffic congestion and noise on Valley View Avenue. La Mirada City Council members on Tuesday approved an agreement with Santa Fe Springs to give the latter city the lead role in constructing the bridge on Valley View, near Stage Road. This evening, Santa Fe Springs City Council members are expected to approve the agreement and award a $1.24 million contract to URS Inc. to manage the project. The council also is expected to authorize city staff to hire a company to help Santa Fe Springs acquire land for the long-awaited project. If all goes as planned, officials said, a construction contract could be awarded by November. Construction of the rail underpass could be completed by spring 2009, said Don Jensen, Santa Fe Springs’ public works director. “This is a project that’s very important to our community,” said Steve Forster, La Mirada public works director. “Many of our residents are affected by the train noise, delays and vibrations by trains that are idling.” Cherry Honeycutt, who lives near Valley View and Stage Road, can’t wait. “I really am excited about getting it done, but I also am jaded because it has taken so long,” she said. “The trains have been getting louder and more aggressive with their horn blowing.” She and her neighbors have long complained about train noise and traffic congestion at the rail crossing. But Honeycutt said the problems turned personal for her when a train blocking cars from crossing Valley View made her miss the birth of her grandson in 1999. And there have been several false starts on the project, she said. In 2001 the bridge received full funding from the state. At the time, the projected cost of construction was pegged at $29.7 million. But then the state, faced with a budget crisis, took back the money. Now, however, the project appears to be back on track, with the $44.5 million construction budget financed through federal and state funds. The next step involves acquiring land for easements and a temporary road around the site during the two-year construction phase. The land acquisition will cost an estimated $2.7 million, Jensen said. mike.sprague@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022 last_img read more

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Man United transfer news: Target open to ‘dream’ Premier League move

first_img huge blow Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury no dice Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Manchester United transfer target Ivan Perisic has reiterated it is his ‘dream’ to play in the Premier League.The Inter Milan star is in England as his club take on Tottenham Hotspur in the Champions League. It’s a vital clash with the Italian side knowing they will progress to the knockout stages of the competition with just a draw against their opponents at Wembley.Perisic, 29, has long been linked with a transfer to the English top flight but is yet to complete a switch.Man United have a long-held interest in the left winger’s services and as Jose Mourinho looks to build his squad, they may look to swoop in January.And it appears the Croatia star would be open to a move should one materialise in the coming transfer windows. REVEALED MONEY Asked whether he would like to play in the Premier League, he replied: “I have always said that it is my dream, in football everything is possible, we will see in the future. Now I’m focusing on Inter. “ Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade center_img Inter Milan star Ivan Perisic in Champions League action. Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won REVEALED ADVICE RANKED Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card REPLY BEST OF shining 1 Latest Football Storieslast_img read more

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Pearce believes he will be given time

first_imgManager Stuart Pearce admits Nottingham Forest’s confidence has been shaken, but insists he does not fear for his job.Brentford overtook the Reds in the Championship table and moved to ninth with a resounding 3-1 at the City Ground.First-half goals from Jon Toral and Andre Gray, and Alex Pritchard’s penalty after the break put the result beyond doubt, with Michael Antonio’s thunderous response from distance coming too late to help Pearce’s side, who have now gone 10 games without a win.The Hammersmith-born Pearce pinpointed the early second-half penalty and the weak backpass from substitute Eric Lichaj which led to Gray’s goal as symptoms of their poor run of form.“It erodes the confidence and with that decent players become nervous players who want to shift the ball from back to front too readily,” said Pearce.Andre Gray netted Brentford’s second goal at the City Ground“I think a victory solves that but it seems very elusive at the moment when we keep making those errors.”Pearce, a legend as a Forest player, says he is taking their recent slump personally.“I care about this football club more than just a job as a manager,” he said.“I feel part of the terrace culture if you like. This club means a lot to me so defeat hurts.“I never fear losing my job or failure. I never have done in my life.“I have a chairman who has been fantastically supportive of me. I believe am in the infancy of a job here.“We have won more games than we have lost but we are on a bad run and we need a victory as soon as we can.”See also:Brilliant Bees win at Nottingham ForestFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Kurtenbach: What’s to say these aren’t the ‘real’ Warriors?

first_imgAnd they failed in spectacular fashion.The Clippers had no business winning one game over the Warriors in the teams’ first-round NBA Playoff series, … CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceOAKLAND — Wednesday’s Game 5 wasn’t an opportunity for the Warriors — it was a test.A test of their championship character; of their ability to grit their teeth and get a job done.[vemba-video id=”van/sc/2019/04/25/bang_c8ca9474-e8c4-4a75-ad6f-33308222fc8c”]last_img

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If You Can’t Trust Scientists, You Can’t Trust Science

first_imgScience may be “out there” in the world, but its discoveries are mediated by fallible scientists.“We can’t trust common sense but we can trust science.” That’s Peter Ellerton’s message on The Conversation. Ellerton, a lecturer in critical thinking at Queensland University, relays the typical triumphalist view of science as the rational alternative to intuition: “science is not about common sense,” he intones. Our intuitions don’t apply in quantum mechanics nor in what “feels right” about reality. It’s instructive that two examples he gives of “common sense” being wrong are opposition to gay marriage and unbelief in man-caused climate change. So while he warns of “cognitive biases,” did he warn himself?Ellerton finds strength in numbers. “In science, the highest unit of cognition is not the individual, it is the community of scientific enquiry…. We are smarter together than we are individually, and perhaps that’s just common sense.” Let’s see if that holds up under scrutiny, based on some recent headlines. Does the scientific community deserve our unqualified trust?“How did that make it through peer review?” In this PLoS Blog, vertebrate paleontologist Andrew Farke is slightly more cynical (realistic?) about collective wisdom in science. From his own experience for years as a researcher, reviewer and editor, Farke exposes the sausage-making that goes on in back rooms of journal companies about peer review, that assumed gold standard of scientific self-correction and trustworthiness. Among the real-world foibles he discusses are shortcomings and bad tendencies all human beings know too well:Editorial incompetenceEditor’s lack of expertise in the subjectReviewer lack of expertise in the subjectReviewer laziness or sloppinessReviewer hasteAuthorial shenanigansAuthor ignoring the reviewers’ commentsReviewer a personal friend of an authorWide differences in responses from different reviewersEgregious errors missed by reviewersComplexity of the subject matter that few reviewers understandMulti-disciplinary nature of the subject that no one reviewer can fathomMuch peer review involves one editor and 2 to 4 reviewersDistracting figures used just to break up long blocks of textInability to check original materials, such as fossils in a distant museumSome journals more lax in editorial policies than othersTaxonomic scoring of characters in phylogenetic analyses are rarely checked (too complex)Reviewer doesn’t care about review workFarke’s bottom line is, “Reviewers and editors are human. Peer review isn’t perfect. Mistakes will make it into the permanent literature, even under the best of circumstances. A more open peer review process is one way forward.” He advocates more transparency using social media, although he still believes pre-publication peer review has value.“Reproducibility: A tragedy of errors.” That’s the title of an article in Nature, and Andrew Farke takes some gratification that the leading journal in the world pretty much agrees with his analysis: “Today Nature published a piece that touches on many of the same issues. It’s well worth checking out!” he ends. In this article, Allison, Brown, George and Kaiser ask, “Just how error-prone and self-correcting is science? We have spent the past 18 months getting a sense of that.” They start with a good example: independent reviewers whose analysis led an author to retract a paper. “Sadly,” they say, “in our experience, the case is not representative.” They found many papers with “substantial or invalidating errors.” When they took it upon themselves to search for big errors, human weakness reared its lazy head:After attempting to address more than 25 of these errors with letters to authors or journals, and identifying at least a dozen more, we had to stop — the work took too much of our time. Our efforts revealed invalidating practices that occur repeatedly … and showed how journals and authors react when faced with mistakes that need correction.To Farke’s list of peer-review foibles, these four authors add more:Authors who use inappropriate or non-randomization methods despite claiming experiments were randomizedAuthors claiming “mathematically or physiologically impossible results”Mistaken design or analysis of cluster-randomized trialsMiscalculation in meta-analysesInappropriate baseline comparisonsInconsistent post-publication peer review that doesn’t catch errorsThinking sincerity is enoughJournals who de-incentivize self-correction, like charging an author $10,000 to initiate a retractionEditors who are often unable or reluctant to take speedy and appropriate actionJournals that don’t make it clear where to send expressions of concernJournals that acknowledge invalidating errors but are unwilling to issue retractionsPolicies that expect one author to correct another co-author’s mistakesNo standard mechanism to request raw data on which a paper is basedEditors that overlook informal expressions of concernEditors that delay responding to expressions of concern“The scientific community must improve,” the authors warn. One commenter probably didn’t make Nature happy with this embarrassing anecdote:Ironically, Nature itself is not immune to this phenomenon. I tried to get recognition for the following obvious mathematical flaws in a 2009 Nature article: [citation]. After years, I have given up.“Make journals report clinical trials properly.” In an editorial in Nature, Ben Goldacre is fed up at “troubling” trends in science. “There is no excuse for the shoddy practice of allowing researchers to change outcomes and goals without saying so,” this member of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine says. Having a Scientific Method is not enough, he argues, nor are Codes of Conduct. There needs to be integrity at both the personal and institutional level.Science is in flux. The basics of a rigorous scientific method were worked out many years ago, but there is now growing concern about systematic structural flaws that undermine the integrity of published data: selective publication, inadequate descriptions of study methods that block efforts at replication, and data dredging through undisclosed use of multiple analytical strategies. Problems such as these undermine the integrity of published data and increase the risk of exaggerated or even false-positive findings, leading collectively to the ‘replication crisis’….You might think that this problem is so obvious that it would already be competently managed by researchers and journals. But that is not the case. Repeatedly, academic papers have been published showing that outcome-switching is highly prevalent, and that such switches often lead to more favourable statistically significant results being reported instead. This is despite numerous codes of conduct set up to prevent such switching, most notably the widely respected CONSORT guidelines, which require reporting of all pre-specified outcomes and an explanation for any changes. Almost all major medical journals supposedly endorse these guidelines, and yet we know that undisclosed outcome-switching persists.“Strength in members“. With these concerns aired vociferously by those who compare science ideals with actual practice, what’s the mood at the Editor level? How are things over at the AAAS, publisher of Science? After reading all the above, it’s a little disconcerting to hear Editor Rush Holt speak triumphantly about how good his organization is doing, especially after his controversial appointment by Obama led to charges of polarizing science politically (see 2/22/15). The staunch Democrat doesn’t help matters when he includes, among the AAAS’s list of great achievements, the following: “from funding the legal defense in the 1925 Scopes trial on teaching evolution, to challenging today’s politically motivated interference in research in climate change and in social and behavioral sciences, and denouncing legislated restrictions on the study of gun violence as a public health issue.” Incidentally, regarding climate change, Science Daily just pointed out that assumptions about tree-ring dating to infer past climate failed to take uncertainties into account. “This suggests that there is less certainty than implied by a reconstruction developed using any one set of assumptions.”“False positives are statistically inevitable“. In a letter to Science, a statistician from Virginia Polytechnic hails the trend for reproducibility, but cautions that “false positives are statistically inevitable” given the number of papers published each year. Even in the best papers, written with the best of intentions, following all the proper protocols, R. D. Fricker, Jr. says it’s a mathematical certainty that some papers will show statistically significant results, yet be false – even though the results are reproduced by others.Reproducibility is clearly important, and we should support and encourage those who promote it—across all fields, not just psychology—as a crucial part of the scientific enterprise. In particular, moving away from publication standards based solely on the statistical significance of a single experiment or a single set of observed data to those based on evidence that observed results can be reproduced is a critical change that we must make in the academic publishing culture. However, we must also recognize that, even within the most careful and rigorous experimental framework, erroneous conclusions are always possible. We should thus always maintain a healthy skepticism when assessing study results.He calculates that 3,370 papers a year could have “confirmed” spurious results.For you atheists who read CEH, who worship at the halls of science and wrongly think we hate science, did you notice who wrote these warnings? They come from some of the leading science journals in the world. They’re not basing their concerns on religion, but they are truly worried about bad behavior by scientists, and even bad results from good scientists. The bad practices are widespread, they say; “the scientific community must improve.”Without doubt there are many excellent, honest scientists doing great work from the purest motives, who are careful, self-critical, and as unbiased as any human can be. But these concerns about the “scientific community” are non-trivial. Pressures on even the honest scientists to fudge or be careless, whether from rivalry, pressure, desire for funding or even fatigue, are real. Errors creeping into published “confirmed” results cannot be eliminated.We see here again, too, as we have documented often, that Big Science is strongly biased to the political left (10/14/10, 7/16/12, 3/22/13, 6/26/13, 12/10/13, 2/28/14, 5/31/14, 12/07/14), and their enablers in Big Media deliver that ideology uncritically to the public (8/16/15, 1/11/16). Ellerton showed it in his bias toward gay marriage and climate change. Rush Holt showed it in his praise of funding the Scopes Trial and other leftist causes. Is he unaware that the Scopes Trial was one of the most egregiously misreported judicial events of the 20th century? The behavior of Darrow, his science advisers and pro-Scopes reporters was shameful. Holt should be embarrassed, but instead he’s proud that the AAAS funded that circus! If he really believed in academic freedom in science education, he would support honest teaching about Darwinism in this topsy-turvy world where the plaintiffs have become the bigots, refusing to permit critics of Darwinism to have a voice, forcing taxpayers to be indoctrinated with one-sided, sanitized propaganda.We cannot stress enough that science cannot function without morality. Science is not “out there” for anyone to latch onto using some kind of reliable method. Brute facts are facts, but humans are only human; they can only access facts through fallible senses and fallen natures. No amount of policy can overcome evil hearts. If anyone thinks peer review protects against flawed findings, who watches the watchers? They’re “only human” too. All intellectual endeavor breaks down without integrity.Peer review can help, both pre-publication and post-publication. Transparency and social media are beginning to open up the sausage factory to the light. But these are mere sieves. The best hope is changed hearts: scientists who love truth and live with internalized self-control through divine power and enablement. That comes about by repentance and trust in the only way our Creator provided for righteousness.(Visited 61 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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