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Kobe Bryant in Germany For Medical Treatment

Just as news surfaced that Kobe Bryant has practiced this week for the first time since tearing his Achilles tendon in April, there is a recent report saying that he is overseas for an unrelated medical procedure.The Los Angeles Times report says that Bryant did not consult coach Mike D’Antoni prior to leaving for the trip. D’Antoni says he didn’t have a problem with the abrupt departure.“I don’t think it’s a surprise,” D’Antoni said Thursday. “I think he had it programmed, and just the way it was, he knew he had time because he’s not getting on the court yet. So I don’t think it’s a big deal, and I don’t think it caught him by surprise. Instead of doing it in August, he’s doing it now.“There’s no concern whatsoever.”The Los Angeles Lakers star will return in the beginning of next week, according to sources.Bryant went to Germany twice before in 2011. He had a surgical procedure on his sore right knee and a sore left ankle. The NBA all-star is reportedly going there again for another knee procedure, according to The Los Angeles Times. read more

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The Jets Deal For LeVeon Bell Makes Sense Were Surprised Too

In an era when NFL success is defined by passing, one New York team said goodbye to one of the most electrifying young receivers in league history, and the other decided to make a 27-year-old running back the centerpiece of its new offense.Odell Beckham Jr. is out in New York football, and Le’Veon Bell is in. Bell’s move was nearly a year in the making, as he sat out the entire 2018 season in hopes of landing a long-term contract from a new team. It was assumed that he would pick a franchise on the precipice of winning a championship, but instead he chose the Jets, who went 4-12 last year and have a 21-year-old quarterback in Sam Darnold.Can Bell, five seasons and 1,541 total touches into his career, still perform at a Hall of Fame level? Through 2016, it looked as if Bell may have been worse for all the wear from his historic rushing and receiving workload, but he actually rebounded in 2017, his last season.When we last saw Bell, in the divisional round of the AFC playoffs for that 2017 season, he was the best player on the field. And the fact that Bell stopped the clock last year on his touches could work to the Jets’ benefit. According to my research last year at The Wall Street Journal, running backs typically maintain peak rushing efficiency through about career touch 2,400 (not including touches in the postseason). At Bell’s current per-game pace, that’s about 34 games (or two-plus seasons) away. So the Jets are making a good bet that Bell will earn his $35 million guaranteed on his four-year, $52.5 million deal — less than the Jets reportedly were prepared to pay linebacker Anthony Barr before he backed out of that deal to return to Minnesota. 7Alex SmithRedskins3696116.5 2Sam DarnoldJets4598919.4 4Ryan TannehillDolphins3156019.1 3Josh RosenCardinals4518619.1 * Pass attempts and sacksBased on a minimum of 170 total pass attemptsSource: ESPN Stats & Information Group The Jets often put Sam Darnold in a tough spotAmong 2018 NFL quarterbacks, the greatest share of all dropbacks* that were on third down and long 9Russell WilsonSeahawks4998116.2 5Josh AllenBills3967117.9 RankPlayerTeamTotal3rd & LongShare Dropbacks 6Dak PrescottCowboys61010316.9 8Marcus MariotaTitans4076716.5 1Lamar JacksonRavens2034019.7% 10Deshaun WatsonTexans61910016.2 The Jets seem to have needed Bell more than Bell needed the Jets. They were simply awful last year running the ball. The Jets’ play success when running on first and second down last year ranked 31st in the league, at just 31.8 percent, according to ESPN’s Stats & Information Group. This meant that the Jets were routinely behind schedule in terms of down and distance, forcing Darnold to play uphill. Enter Bell, who in his previous two seasons had a 41.4 percent success rate on first and second down.It’s may be surprising that Darnold, who posted mediocre numbers on the whole during his rookie year, could attract such a top free-agent receiving target at the peak of his ability. Darnold wasn’t Baker Mayfield last year. He struggled mightily, especially before missing three games with injury beginning in Week 10. But upon his return, Darnold was excellent — without receiving the fanfare that Baker Mayfield generated in the season’s second half. In weeks 14 through 17, the rookie from USC was actually was the top quarterback in football measured by Total QBR. And Darnold achieved this distinction despite being saddled with the least successful running game in football in that period.Darnold and Bell could be well-matched. As a rookie, Darnold showed an ability to make plays on- and off-script.“Darnold is going to be really good,” said Josh McCown, his backup and mentor last year. “Making plays in and out of structure is the key. He has that thing that Aaron Rodgers and a few guys have — an ability to get outside the pocket and make something happen when the play isn’t working. It’s a special gift.” McCown compares Darnold to Tony Romo. And Romo is among Darnold’s biggest fans, correctly predicting in midseason the dramatic leap in his performance that was yet to come.And Darnold’s growth in the season’s home stretch coincided with great success passing to running backs. That success came throwing to the likes of Elijah McGuire and Trenton Cannon. Now he gets to throw to one of the most prolific receiving running backs through age 25 in NFL history.Bell leaves a Pittsburgh Steelers team that boasted the best offensive line in football for a Jets team that, well, does not. But the Jets already made a major move to improve that unit, adding Pro Bowl guard Kelechi Osemele in a trade with the Raiders. And last season in Miami, new Jets head coach Adam Gase was able to reinvigorate the seemingly moribund career of ancient Frank Gore, who posted by far his most efficient rushing season since 2012.The sudden shift of star power in East Rutherford, N.J., is already allowing the Jets to win the back pages of New York tabloids. Now they’ll have to see if they can make up ground on the field, too. read more

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Buckeye defense halts offense in spring scrimmage

When it rains, it pours, and today’s football scrimmage proved true figuratively and literally for the Buckeye offense, which failed to score a single touchdown. The defense won the scrimmage, 74-62, when heavy rain and lightning caused an abrupt finish. With no completions and only two first downs in the first seven possessions, the offense couldn’t find its rhythm. The offense gave the ball away four times and mustered just 171 yards on 17 possessions. Leading the way for the defense was sophomore defensive tackle Jonathan Hankins, who had a tackle for loss, a sack and numerous stops on third and short, where the offense failed four times to convert. The scrimmage began with kick returns. Sophomore running back Jaamal Berry electrified the crowd with a 95-yard return for a touchdown up the sideline. Jordan Hall also returned a kick back to the 40, and Chris Fields had a return to the 47 yard line. When the offense took to the field, it began backed up against its own one-yard line. They went three and out under senior quarterback Joe Bauserman, thanks in part to strong pass defense from junior cornerback Travis Howard. The next offensive set, Berry rumbled for nine yards and had a huge collision with sophomore safety Jamie Wood. Wood left the game shortly after and did not return, saying that his shoulder “popped out.” Redshirt freshman Taylor Graham continued to put the ball on the money, but numerous drops bogged his stats down to 3-10 for 27 yards. Braxton Miller, the highly touted freshman quarterback, was 2-4 for 22 yards. The other quarterbacks fared no better, with sophomore Kenny Guiton going 3-7 for 31 yards with one interception, and Bauserman hitting 1-4 for 11 yards, with one interception. Both interceptions were recorded by redshirt freshman cornerback Bradley Roby, and both went through the hands of Corey “Philly” Brown and Berry to reach Roby. The offense did not find any more luck on the ground. The leading rusher was redshirt freshman Roderick Smith, with six carries for 30 of the offense’s 80 total yards rushing. The entire defense looked stout, but freshman safety Jeremy Cash might have had the most impressive day. The Florida product had many tackles, including a big hit that jarred the ball loose from Verlon Reed. Dorian Bell recovered it. Cash also broke up several passes. Senior Florida State transfer Dionte Allen unloaded on Berry from his cornerback position, and sophomore defensive end Melvin Fellows drilled Guiton on a pass rush. Terrelle Pryor remains limited in practice and threw in sweatpants. Pryor joins suspended players Dan Herron, DeVier Posey, Mike Adams and Solomon Thomas and coach Jim Tressel for the first five games of the upcoming season. read more

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Ohio State tenniss Blaz Rola and Chase Buchanan win doubles tournament

Sophomore Blaz Rola and senior Chase Buchanan of the Ohio State men’s tennis team won the 2011 USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Doubles Championship in Flushing, N.Y. on Sunday. The No. 2-seeded duo defeated the third-seeded Clifford Marsland and Ashley Watling from Tulsa, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2, at the USTA-Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. For the second consecutive match, the pair had to come from behind to earn the victory. “It was a great win,” Buckeye head coach Ty Tucker said. “Chase and Blaz played well and won their second national event of the season. I think only four or five teams have won both events in the history of college tennis. We are looking forward to getting better and starting the [dual] season in January.” Rola and Buchanan are the first Buckeye team to reach the National Indoors Doubles Championship since Scott Green and Ross Wilson won the event in 2005. USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships is the last event for the tennis team until their season resumes Jan. 8, for the USTA Futures event in Plantation, Fla. read more

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Deshaun Thomas 4th grade love affair elevates Buckeyes in NCAA Tournament

BOSTON – Deshaun Thomas and scoring have had a love affair dating back to when he was in the fourth grade. At a gym in his native state of Indiana, he was just shooting around. Hook shots, bank shots, long shots and short shots – they were all going in. “That’s when I knew I was something special,” Thomas said. “I was in a gym throwing up shots and they (were) going in. I was just hitting them and doing everything. I knew I was going to be a scorer.” And a scorer he became. In middle school, he once had 44 points, 33 rebounds and 11 blocks in a single game. With performances like that, it didn’t take long until other people thought he was special, too. Ohio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta knew Thomas before he was in high school and Thomas verbally committed to play basketball for the Matta’s squad in the eighth grade. Thomas said he was taller than everybody then, but things didn’t change much when he got to high school. During his freshman year, he scored a career-high 52 points in a varsity game. Throughout his high school career, Thomas said the ball was in his hands “110 percent of the time.” It was a scorer’s dream. His team and coach wanted him to shoot and score as much as he possibly could. “I had that green light,” he said. “I mean that light-green light.” So, Thomas let it fly and eventually shot his way into the history books. By the time he graduated, he was the No. 3-leading scorer in the history of the basketball-rich state of Indiana. Then, Thomas arrived at OSU for his freshman year, and for the first time in his life he wasn’t the focal point of the offense. In fact, he wasn’t even in the starting lineup. Thomas said the adjustment wasn’t easy. “For me, not playing (was the hardest thing),” Thomas said. “Coming from a high school where I played every minute, touching the ball every time and having that green light, that was very hard not playing because you want to be out there.” When Thomas did come in the game, he said he was still playing like he did in high school, and before long, he quickly developed a reputation among fans for shooting too much and shooting too quickly. “Last year I used to come in the game and chuck threes, just play to get that shot up,” Thomas said. “I didn’t play defense.” In OSU’s NCAA tournament run in 2011, Thomas attempted one shot – an airball against Kentucky. “I just felt, ‘Hey I’m going to get this shot up. It’s the NCAA Tournament,’” Thomas said of the shot. Matta said that mentality is part of what got Thomas into trouble last season for shooting too much and a big part of what kept him on the bench. Thomas still had the ability to score at a high level. Matta kept Thomas with the second string in practice because his scoring alone could “keep a scrimmage close.” But Matta said Thomas wasn’t able to do the other things like play effective defense to warrant more playing time. He finished the season averaging 7.5 points a game in an average of 14 minutes of action. But, the end of the year saw the departure of former starters Jon Diebler, David Lighty and Dallas Lauderdale. Suddenly, there was room for Thomas to take a bigger role in the offense in 2011-12. He took advantage. As the Buckeyes have marched to the Elite Eight for the first time since 2007, Thomas leads the Buckeyes in scoring during postseason play. He’s averaged 21.7 points since the beginning of the Big Ten Tournament and with his 31-point performance against Loyola (MD), he became just the seventh Buckeye in history to score 30 or more points in an NCAA Tournament game. In OSU’s win against Cincinnati in the Sweet 16, Thomas had 20 points in the first half and 26 for the game. He’s back to what he does best and back in the role he said he knew he was meant for since fourth grade. “You have to look for him,” sophomore guard Aaron Craft said. “Once he gets going, it’s tough to stop him. If he’s having a good night, you just try to ride him.” Craft said it’s gotten to the point where it doesn’t matter whether Thomas has made or missed his last five shots. He is always an option. “He’s going to keep shooting,” Craft said. “He trusts in his shot and we trust in him. We have all the confidence in the world regardless of how many shots he’s made or missed before that.” Thomas agreed. “Once I hit the first couple, I just feel so comfortable and confident knocking down the next one,” he said. Matta said the biggest change in Thomas isn’t on the offensive end, though. “I think back to last year defensively, he was trying so hard, but he had to think everything through,” Matta said. “Now, he’s playing and just reacting.” Thomas said he didn’t always like defense. His focus was always on the offensive end of the floor and the next shot he was going to take. That isn’t true anymore. “I like playing defense now,” Thomas said. “It’s a game-changer.” His improvement didn’t come easy, though. His coach said Thomas has worked hard hone his skills in every facet of the game. “No one is happier for Deshaun than me,” Matta said. “I’ve seen everything he’s put into being a better player and now what he’s getting out of it.” His change in defensive mentality has helped him on the offensive end as well. Craft said he’s realizing how everything he does individually fits in with the team as a whole. “Deshaun has done a great job this year growing up as a player and understanding what’s a good shot for him and what’s a great shot for him,” Craft said. “Even giving up some shots to other players when they have better ones. It’s just great to see him grow and become a complete basketball player.” And Thomas said he’s happy with where his game is too. He said he feels like he’s in a rhythm and, as he’s shooting 55.6 percent from the field in the NCAA Tournament, it’s hard to argue otherwise. “I’m going to keep on doing what I’m doing,” Thomas said. “I’m pretty sure everybody’s looking.” Some of those people looking may be NBA scouts. Thomas’ recent play has called into question whether he’ll opt to turn return to OSU for his junior season or declare for the NBA Draft. “People are starting to notice now what Deshaun can bring to the table,” Thomas said. “Every kid’s dream is to try and make it to the pros.” But for now, Thomas said he’s focused on OSU’s next opponent: Syracuse. OSU and Syracuse are scheduled to play at 7:05 p.m. Saturday in Boston with the winner advancing to the Final Four in New Orleans. Many have pegged Thomas as the key to breaking Syracuse’s famous 2-3 zone. “I know by watching them there’s stuff I can do to break down Syracuse and their 2-3,” Thomas said. “My mindset is show no mercy, play hard and attack them. Don’t let them get nothing easy.” As for all the attention Thomas has been getting, he’s not worried about it. He said he’s just focused on winning whether he’s the scorer or not. “Once we make it to that promised land we want to make,” he said, “we’ll all get love.” read more

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With loss to Notre Dame Ohio State mens ice hockeys season over

The No. 3 seed Ohio State men’s ice hockey team lost Saturday to No. 2 seed Notre Dame, 3-1, in the CCHA tournament semifinals at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit. The loss brought the Buckeyes’ (16-17-7) season to a close, while the Irish won against No. 4 seed Michigan, 3-1, on Sunday to take home the championship title. Each team scored a goal in the opening period. OSU sophomore forward Ryan Dzingel received a pass from freshman forward Anthony Greco and scored his 16th goal of the season to put his team ahead, 1-0. Sophomore forward Tanner Fritz picked up the second assist on the play. The Irish answered less than a minute later on a 3-on-1 breakaway following a Buckeye turnover. OSU coach Mark Osiecki said a team like Notre Dame capitalizes on opponents’ mistakes more often than not. “I just think that was a good response by a (veteran) team. The only frustrating thing there was that we turned the puck over, so it comes back to bite you a bit, but good teams find a way to respond and they did,” Osiecki said. OSU senior goalie Brady Hjelle stood tall in the first period, as Notre Dame outshot OSU, 11-5, including eight straight attempts within the first five minutes of the game. The second period went scoreless. The closest either team came to earning points came when OSU junior forward Alex Lippincott hit the post two minutes into the period. The officials signaled no goal on the ice and the call stood after the review showed the puck only partially crossed the goal line. The game winner came 3:50 into the third when Notre Dame junior center T.J. Tynan scored a power-play goal off a face-off. Notre Dame sealed the victory with an empty netter with 1:10 remaining. The Buckeyes were unable to cash in either of their two power-play opportunities. The Irish special teams went 1-for-3 on their chances. OSU was outshot 44-17 in the contest. Hjelle had 41 saves, and Notre Dame junior goalie Steven Summerhays made 16 stops. The limited number of attempts on net was an issue the Buckeyes battled through at multiple points this season. “Coach had been stressing shooting the puck all year, and I don’t think it was trouble, I think it was a mindset. We could’ve thrown more pucks on net, but that’s how the game turned out and you can’t do anything now,” Dzingel said. Despite coming short of the conference championship game, Osiecki said he was not disappointed in his team’s performance, on the night or on the season. “We said to our guys after we were proud (to) get to this point, to get on this great stage, it’s been a while for our program,” Osiecki said. “I’m awfully proud of what they went through this year.” read more

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Mens hockey Ohio States 201617 success due to senior class

Ohio State senior goaltender Christian Frey stretches out to make a save against Michigan at the Schottenstein Center on Feb. 25. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo Editor650 games, 119 goals, 320 points and nearly 4,000 saves. These statistics represent the accomplishments of the members of the Ohio State men’s hockey class of 2017.The seven seniors — forwards Nick Schilkey and David Gust, defensemen Drew Brevig and Josh Healey, and goaltenders Christian Frey, Matt Tomkins and Logan Davis — have recorded 63 victories in 140 games and, collectively, put Buckeye hockey on the map.This unit’s efforts and accomplishments on and off the ice have been recognized over the last four years, as they have racked up a combined eight All-Big Ten honors, 24 Ohio State Scholar-Athlete awards, 21 Big Ten Star of the Week accolades, and four Big Ten Distinguished Scholar recognitions.Ohio State senior forward Nick Schilkey winds a wrister from the left slot against Minnesota on Feb. 11 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Jacob Myers | Assistant Sports EditorWith that being said, coach Steve Rohlik said this group is the reason why OSU hockey has reached the success it has had since the 2013-2014 season began.Two regular season games remain on the schedule for the Scarlet and Gray after Saturday, and Rohlik’s team currently sits on the edge of its first NCAA tournament appearance since 2009. With that, Schilkey said OSU expected to make the tournament from the beginning of the year and that an appearance this season would be “icing on the cake.”“These seven guys have put this program where it needs to be on and off the ice,” Rohlik said. “They’ve done an incredible job, they’re what it is to be a Buckeye. You look at those seven guys, and that’s exactly what it takes.”Surprisingly, not every player in the graduating class joined the Scarlet and Gray roster at the same time. Frey signed his National Letter of Intent with the Buckeyes in Dec. 2013 after playing two seasons with the Dubuque Fighting Saints in the United States Hockey League.After arriving in Columbus, Frey said he wasn’t sure what to expect by coming into a squad in the middle of the season, besides that he was entering an “awkward situation” with two other goal stoppers on the roster. Now, more than four years later, Frey said he still remembers his first experience in an OSU uniform — a 25-save performance in a 6-3 home win.“I remember it was against Mercyhurst, and I was just so nervous playing college hockey for the first time,” Frey said. “I came in like a week before that, and then I was playing my first college hockey game. So it was just crazy for me.”Ohio State senior defenseman Drew Brevig waits for the faceoff in a game against Robert Morris on Nov. 4. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorAdditionally, Frey said he enjoyed meeting the other six members of his class after joining the Buckeyes, though they even gave him a hard time on occasion.“They were all here before me, so they were all buddies and I just kind of came into their group. I remember sophomore year we had a group chat that was, like, ‘sophomore six plus Freyzie,’ so I was just kind of excluded,” Frey said jokingly. “But, it was awesome meeting those guys, and I think we have a really good group of guys in (the locker room).”Among the other seniors, Schilkey has been key to the Scarlet and Gray’s success in the last four seasons. As a two-time captain, the Marysville, Michigan, native has notched 125 points on 66 goals and 59 assists in 135 games played. The Buckeyes’ forward will play his final game at the Schottenstein Center Saturday night, and said he is proud of what this group of seniors has accomplished.“I think we’ve worked hard over the last four years, and it’s special to us to be able to say that we’re trying to leave this program in a better place than we found it; and I think we’ve done that,” Schilkey said. In light of the Buckeyes’ senior night on Saturday night against Michigan State, Schilkey said that emotions will be high for himself and the rest of the senior class, but the team’s collective attention is set on three Big Ten points.“Everything about (Ohio State) has been great to me, it’s been great to the rest of the seniors,” Schilkey said. “We’ve just got to win games, and that’s really been the focus. Whatever Saturday (brings), leaving on a good note or whatever that is, it’s a matter of that we’ve got to win that game.” read more

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Womens Basketball Dorka Juhasz tries to live up to her moms expectation

Ohio State freshman forward Dorka Juhasz shoots a jumper in practice. Credit: Daniel McNatt | Lantern ReporterComing to a new country with a new team at a new school to play the sport you love has its challenges. But doing so while carrying the legacy of a mother who was once idolized in your home country is another obstacle to overcome.This is the situation for Dorka Juhasz, a freshman forward for Ohio State from Pecs, Hungary, whose mother, Hajnalka Balazs, was a former Hungarian basketball player with club team PVSK-DALIA. Juhasz said her mother was very successful, winning championships and being heralded as a great player in her career.Juhasz described it as a “healthy pressure” having her mother around for her games growing up.“I wanted to play good not just for myself and for my team to win, but also I want to show her what kind of player I am,” Juhasz said.At times growing up, Juhasz said she was known as “her daughter,” not just herself, an aspect of life that many second-generation athletes face until they are able to make a name for themselves.But Balazs, who stopped playing when Juhasz was born, said she is “100 percent sure about” the fact that her daughter is better than she was at 19.While she is happy to see her talented daughter move on to a Division I program like Ohio State, the distance can be hard for both mother and daughter.The relationship Juhasz and her mother share is close and two-sided, including: the mother aspect and the coaching aspect. Juhasz said Balazs sometimes tries to give basketball critiques at the dinner table — and those critiques are constant. Juhasz said lightheartedly it’s not always the best when those two sides of her mother mix together.“Everytime we just sat in the car after games, and we talk about the games,” Juhasz said.  “She was always my second coach. She’s watching the game as a mom but also like as a coach.”The other half — the maternal side — finds it hard for Balazs to watch her daughter live in America and be so far from home, even though she recognizes the opportunity.Balazs and other family members will see Juhasz play the first two games of the season. She might also offer a little advice on her daughter’s game.Juhasz said she is used to it at this point, and recognizes the impact her mother has had on her own success.“I love to talk about her. She is one of the reasons I play this game,” Juhasz said. read more

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Analysis Ohio State mens hockey dangerously coasts into NCAA tournament

Ohio State junior forward Carson Meyer (72) and Michigan State sophomore forward Mitchell Lewandowski (9) throw punches in the first period of game two against Michigan State on March 2. Ohio State lost 3-2. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorA little more than a month ago, the Ohio State men’s hockey team was in the driver’s seat.Coming off a 4-1 win against Wisconsin on Feb. 9, the team’s seventh in a row, the Buckeyes were among the top teams in college hockey, ranking No. 2 in the USCHO.com poll two days later with six first-place votes.Ohio State looked like a team ready to compete for its first national title.Seven games later, the Buckeyes are in freefall, dropping five of its past seven games, including, most recently, a 5-1 beatdown loss to Penn State in the Big Ten tournament semifinals.The Nittany Lions, who came in with the fourth-worst scoring defense in the NCAA, had not given up one goal or less since Dec. 8.“We got a good hockey team in that locker room. We’ve played some really good hockey this year. We certainly weren’t at our best tonight,” Ohio State head coach Steve Rohlik said. “Something that we and me as a coach and our staff gotta make sure we’re prepared for two weeks from now.”Two weeks from now is the NCAA tournament, something that has been seemingly locked up since the victory against the Badgers Feb. 9.At that point, Ohio State was one regulation win from clinching the Big Ten regular season title with six games still remaining on the schedule.It was at that point the Buckeyes became complacent.Ohio State came out flat in both the next two games against Minnesota, falling behind to 2-0 and 3-0 deficits before dropping both games 4-3.But no worries, right? Just win, in regulation or overtime, against Michigan once, and there’s the conference title. For the third game, the Buckeyes couldn’t do it, and it took an overtime goal by senior forward Mason Jobst to beat the Wolverines and win the program’s first regular season title.Since then, Ohio State has only grown more fine with dropping a game here and there, and it all came to a head in the four-goal pummeling against Penn State.Jobst knows this.“We talked about Penn State being desperate, that’s because if they lost tonight, their season was actually over, and as much as I hate to say, maybe we didn’t have that desperation because we kind of knew that we were in the tournament,” Jobst said.Rohlik also knows this.“Big picture things that we’ve done enough body of work to make sure we’re in the tournament, I believe. The disappointing thing is we had a chance to obviously win another trophy,” Rohlik said. “There’s 16 teams left in the country and we’re one of them; that’s the positive.”But how hard is it to get back on track when you’ve been asleep at the wheel for more than a month?Note: The NCAA ranks provided are based on full-season team totals.Graphic by Kelly Meaden | Design EditorPhoto by Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorIn the past seven games, the Buckeyes have scored 0.47 goals fewer and allowed 1.39 goals more than in the first 28 games, when they went 19-5-4.Jobst, Ohio State’s leading scorer, has been limited to two goals and three points in the past seven games after scoring 33 points in the first 28.Tommy Nappier had goals against average and save percentage numbers that would now lead the nation through his first 15 games, but in his past four, his .883 save percentage and 3.00 goals against average would rank him No. 75 and No. 57 in the NCAA, respectively.The power play has gotten worse. The penalty kill has gotten worse. Ohio State, in general, has gotten worse and has only itself to blame.The Buckeyes have a chance to get better: there are two weeks separating them from the NCAA tournament, where they will now be a two or three seed instead of the potential one seed they were looking at a month ago.For Jobst, it is his last chance at the title, and he said he is prepared to turn on the gas.“Now, as a senior class, the true desperation is gonna come out,” Jobst said. “Our lives are on the line every single game from here on out.”But after a month of failing to live up to everything the team was for the first three quarters of the season, Ohio State will have to create momentum out of thin air to make a tournament run better than the one in 2018. read more

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TV presenter Jamelia accuses fellow train passenger of prejudice over first class

first_imgJamelia tweets Jamelia and her daughter Tiana then moved, adding that a “white guy” who then sat in her seat was not challenged by the same woman.She said: “My daughter looks over at the lady and says ‘Are you not going to ask him for his credentials then?’ The lady turned as red as a beetroot.”I’m done not calling people out. I am also raising two wonderful young women who will grow up to call you out too… you have been warned.”Last year, Jamelia said she was left scared for the safety of her children after she was racially abused by a man she believed was a police officer. Before anyone asks 🙄😩😂 pic.twitter.com/O0iqhfH77l— #Яebel (@Jamelia) January 12, 2017 She wrote: “So, I got on the train with my 11 year old daughter… didn’t even sit my bum on the seat good & a lady approaches me & asks me if I have a 1st class ticket.”I look around. My daughter & I r the only black people in the packed carriage. I ask her ‘why did you ask me that?’.”She replies ‘well I’ve just seen the conductor & he won’t let you travel in this carriage’. I ask ‘why?’. She says ‘you need a 1st ticket’.”I ask ‘why have you assumed I don’t have a 1st class ticket?’ She says ‘well, have you got one?’. I reply ‘have you?’. She says ‘yes I have’.”I ask ‘what made you ask that question to me and no one else?’ She says ‘it’s because I wanted to sit with you, I just need to make sure’.”I say ‘I don’t need a ticket for u to sit opposite me, no need to lie, my 11 year old could tell you why you asked, why not just be honest?’.” This is earlier…but hella appropriate 😂😂😂 pic.twitter.com/bbhiugkGnB— #Яebel (@Jamelia) January 12, 2017center_img Jamelia said she told the woman “the least you could do is admit you were wrong to do so”, to which she said the woman asked what she was implying.She said: “I laugh, and say ‘let’s be honest, you’ve asked me because I look like young black girl & you’ve allowed your prejudice to speak for you’.”Jamelia said she laughed when the woman said she “would ask anyone I’m sitting with if they have a first class ticket”.She said: “I look her dead in the eye & say ‘let this be a lesson to you, don’t you ever make this assumption out loud again, I hope you feel ashamed’.” Jamelia, the television presenter, has said she was singled out by a fellow passenger to show a first class train ticket because she is “young and black”.The former Loose Women panellist and singer, 36, said she was in the first class carriage on a train with her 11-year-old daughter when she clashed with another traveller.In a lengthy series of posts on Twitter, Jamelia said the unidentified female passenger was left as “red as a beetroot” when challenged.Jamelia said her day had been ruined because somebody killed her “vibe”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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